Passive income is also not subjected to self-employment taxes. But similar to portfolio income, it might be subject to the Net Investment Income tax. So, if you own a rental house, the income generated from the rental house is considered passive income. As a side note, taxpayers used to label themselves as Real Estate Professionals under IRS definition to allow passive losses to be deducted; now we are seeing the same label to avoid Net Investment Income tax on rental income.
This one may seem simple, but that’s only because it is. If you were to move your savings from a traditional, brick-and-mortar bank with a low-interest rate and into a high-yield savings account online, over time you can make a surprising amount of extra cash. Online banks are FDIC-insured just like the traditional brick-and-mortar institutions, so your money is just as safe.
For a closely held corporation, the passive activity loss is the excess of passive activity deductions over the sum of passive activity gross income and net active income. For details on net active income, see the Instructions for Form 8810. For the definition of passive activity gross income, see Passive Activity Income , later. For the definition of passive activity deductions, see Passive Activity Deductions , later.
The government has announced its intention to introduce legislation that will reduce the SBD limit by $5 for every $1 of investment income above a $50,000 threshold, beginning in 2019. Once passive investment income exceeds $150,000, the SBD limit will be reduced to zero and the CCPC will pay tax at the general corporate tax rate of 26.5% as opposed to the 13.5% SBD Rate (for Ontario CCPCs).
I've got a $185,000 CD generating 3% interest coming due. Although the return is low, it's guaranteed. The CD gave me the confidence to invest more aggressively in risk over the years. My online interest income has come down since I aggressively deployed some capital at the beginning of the year and again during the February market correction. You'll see these figures in my quarterly investment-income update.
I’m confused by your reference to passive income. Passive income doesn’t mean totally free money or money earned without work although you make several references to making money in your sleep without any effort. Now, I understand the concept of passive income but I have to believe that you must still work to obtain that passive investment/ income and then work to maintain it right? Owning a company, in itself, is a lot of work and is thus still considered a JOB right? It’s not till after a lot of blood sweat and tears that one can reach a point where they can say theyve achieved financial freedom with passive income. Maybe you can add a little clarity for me. I’m only in my beginning stages of real estate investing and read as much as I can to learn.
I’m with you Dennis. My whole goal, for years, was to get myself into a position to be able to go back to flight instructing but not be reliant on the income (because it isn’t good). I didn’t know how I would do it, but I ended up starting my own business that I work whenever I want, so now I can pop out to the airport for a couple flights a week and have fun with it, not care about the income (or lack there of) and enjoy it. That is a “job” I will probably always work, but it’s because it’s fun and not required for the income.

A Risk Score of 10 means no risk. A Return Score of 1 means the returns are horrible compared to the risk-free rate. A Feasibility score of 10 means everybody can do it. A Liquidity Score of 1 means it’s very difficult to withdraw your money without a massive penalty. An Activity Score of 10 means you can kick back and do nothing to earn income. To make the ranking as realistic as possible, every score is relative to each other. Furthermore, the return criteria is based off trying to generate $10,000 a year in passive income.


What is passive income?  It is income that is not generated from your day job.  Any net gain at the end of the year is taxed at ordinary income tax rates.  The additional downside: if the rental property generates a loss, you are not able to offset passive losses with ordinary income i.e., wages.  The passive losses can only be used to offset passive income.
My goal is to generate enough passive income (ultimately; for the next few years, I’m definitely working for it both with a day job and property managing my investments) to do what I want, when I want, how I want, and where I want. We all define that “what, when, how, and where” differently, and to each of us, financial freedom means something different.
No offense to the commenter, but you sound like a Complete_Newbie. You are correct that it takes hard work and patience to successfully invest and generate passive income, so do you really expect financial blog posts to provide you with specific deals or no-fail investment opportunities that you can jump on today? And if they do, they are likely just bait-and-switch sales schemes to induce you to pay for coaching or mentoring. You have to do your own leg-work and fact-finding and accept the level of risk that comes with the territory. Solid, free financial advice (like this blog) is pretty awesome and maybe you should take a look at your attitude when you wonder what is standing in the way of your passive income goals.
Some investments, such as certain notes, T-class units of mutual funds and REITs, pay a mixture of income and a return of capital. A return of capital is not included in income in the year received; rather, it reduces the adjusted cost base of the investment and increases the capital gain (or decreases the capital loss) on the future disposition of the investment.
To the uninformed, these varying tax rates initially look unfair. What many people don’t understand is the big difference between “ordinary income” (from wages, a salary, short-term capital gains and interest) and “passive income” (from stock dividends and long-term capital gains). The federal government taxes ordinary income at up to 35 percent and passive income at 15 percent.
I think you should use Financial Samurai to raise your passive income. You’ve already proven that you writing 3 articles a week is enough to not only sustain the site but grow it. Why not have more guest writers post articles? Since you started with the extra post each week I’m guessing traffic is above your normal growth rate. Leverage that up with more posts and my bet traffic will continue to grow.
Logan is a CPA with a Masters Degree in Taxation from the University of Southern California. He has been featured in publications such as Debt.com. He has nearly 10 years of public accounting experience, including 5 with professional services firm Ernst & Young where he consulted with multinational companies and high net worth individuals on their tax situations. He launched Money Done Right in 2017 to communicate modern ideas on earning, saving, and investing money.
A Real Estate Investment Trust (REIT) provides individuals with the opportunity to invest relatively small amounts of money alongside other investors. By pooling resources, a group can take on bigger projects with bigger returns. And the risk of loss is spread across multiple investors, and depending on the size of the REIT, multiple investment properties.
Herbert and Wilma file a joint return, so they’re treated as one taxpayer for purposes of the passive activity rules. The same owner (Herbert and Wilma) owns both Healthy Food and Plum Tower with the same ownership interest (100% in each). If the grouping forms an appropriate economic unit, as discussed earlier, Herbert and Wilma can group Plum Tower's grocery store rental and Healthy Food's grocery business into a single trade or business activity.
Yes, I meant that the non-working spouse would have to be wiling to become a working real estate professional – which certainly may not be an ideal solution for every couple in every circumstance. But, I was able to raise our kids while managing our rental properties as a licensed real estate professional and was always happy for the bumped-up tax benefits. No doubt, though, I was working!

When I purchase an existing online business, I look for cash flow over the past year and where the money comes from. I want the sources to be more passive so that it does not take a lot of my time. Also, typically I will make an offer that is 18 – 24 months of profit so that I know that I will get my money back within the next two years. I hope that helps!
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