4. Home Office: Passive income investors, not unlike most professionals that work from home, are allowed to deduct their home office; provided it meets the minimal criteria. What’s more, this deduction helps both renters and homeowners. You can deduct your home office whether you on the home it is in or are simply renting it. However, like every other deduction on this list, the home office must meet certain requirements to qualify for a deduction.
Despite the anger expressed by the tax community and business owners across the country, the government reiterated in October 2017 its intention to move forward with the proposed passive income rules and promised that further details will be revealed as part of the 2018 budget. February 27, 2018 was the date that the so anticipated federal budget was released and to the surprise of tax practitioners and private business owners, the government completely abandoned its July 2017 passive income proposals. The 2018 budget instead proposes to further restrict the access to the small business deduction (which will not be discussed here) and to refine the refundable taxes regime applying to CCPCs. The proposed new refundable taxes regime is less complex and less costly than the framework suggested by the July 2017 proposals, however, Finance proposes to limit another type of tax deferral allowed prior to the budget as discussed in more details below.
Generally, any gain or loss on the disposition of a partnership interest must be allocated to each trade or business, rental, or investment activity in which the partnership owns an interest. If you dispose of your entire interest in a partnership, the passive activity losses from the partnership that haven’t been allowed generally are allowed in full. They also will be allowed if the partnership (other than a PTP) disposes of all the property used in that passive activity.
Self-publishing belongs firmly at the top of any passive income ideas list. Amazon, with Kindle Direct Publishing (electronic version) and CreateSpace (print on demand version) dominates the self-publishing world. It’s both good and bad. Good in that they’re quite generous with their commission rates (usually 70%). Bad in that they can change their policies at any time to be less favourable for authors and there is nowhere else for us to go. That’s not entirely true. There are a few other options, but none of them are as good as Amazon!
Because passive investors’ rentals are viewed as secondary income, they can only deduct the normal costs associated with their rental properties. They cannot deduct any home office expenses and are limited on how much they can deduct from any losses they might incur. As of 2010, you can only deduct up to $3,000 from your other active income like your job or employment.
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Passive income tax benefits have the potential to turn a good rental property into a great one. However, as I said before, nobody is going to hold your hand and tell you to claim the appropriate deductions; you need to make sure you know what is within your legal right to deduct. I encourage all passive income investors to consult a certified public accountant (CPA) to confirm that they are, in fact, taking advantage of all the deductions made available. Please take note of the passive income tax benefits you qualify for and see to it they contribute to your bottom line instead of taking away from it.


In identifying the items of deduction and loss from an activity that aren’t disallowed under the basis and at-risk limitations (and that therefore may be treated as passive activity deductions), you needn’t account separately for any item of deduction or loss unless such item may, if separately taken into account, result in an income tax liability different from that which would result were such item of deduction or loss taken into account separately.
Why did P2P lending get a liquidity ranking of 6? It is quite possibly the most illiquid investment option you listed. You said you rank liquidity by “difficulty level of withdrawing your money without a massive penalty”, and for Lending Club notes, it’s not only difficult and extremely time consuming to sell all of your notes in their super illiquid market, but you would have to sell your notes at large losses to hope to get others interested in buying your notes. On top of that, it is impossible to withdraw your money any other way other than just waiting for interest/principal to pay off every month until maturity in 3 to 5 years. You can’t just one day tell Lending Club “I want to quit, please give me my money back.” One can even argue that it is less difficult to sell a home (in order to “withdraw” the money invested) than to withdraw all of their money from a P2P loan portfolio because it is very possible to sell a home before 3 to 5 years.

Haha, that is too funny. I wanted to make an app back in the day called “MyShares” (You can probably tell how I cam up with the name at the time). The idea was that I would loan out books and DVD’s and then would never get them back. Then I thought, how cool would it be if I could rent those items out and that would motivate people to bring them back. Obviously, books and DVD’s are cheap, so this isn’t the money maker. The idea that would probably make the most money would be things like tools, ATVs, etc.

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