Money is what makes the world go round…or so they say. The majority of people earn through a linear income, but a fair few have taken the perhaps more bolder route with residual income. So which is better? Correction: so which is better for you? How you earn, how much you earn and when you earn it are all factors that vary in importance depending on your circumstances. That’s why in this article we’re going to review both sides of the coin and let you decide. So without further ado, let’s review linear vs residual income.

Stock dividends: Some stocks, especially stocks from big corporate standouts, pay dividends to shareholders based on the number of shares they own, and the percentage of the stock price on the dividend date. For example, if a company pays out 3% on a stock that's trading at $100 per share, you'll earn $3 for every share of that stock you own. Add it up and that can be good take-home pay as a passive investment.

What could be a better option than to make money out of your hobby? If you’re a hobbyist who creates some sort of artwork such as sketches, doodles, paintings, etc., you can put these up on a portfolio website with your name as the domain name and sell them. You would need to frame the artwork, but do it only when you receive an order. You can easily build a portfolio website with Pixpa and sell your artwork right from there.
Dividend stocks tend to be more mature companies that are past their high growth stage. Utilities, telecoms, and financial sectors tend to make up the majority of dividend paying companies. Tech, Internet, and biotech, on the other hand, tend not to pay any dividends because they are reinvesting most of their retained earnings back into their company for growth.
Anthony, nice setup! To your question about the rental mortgages, you haven’t said what interest rate you are paying. As a start, if you are paying more than the risk free rate (Treasury bills) which you probably are, then a true apples to apples comparison would be yes, pay off the mortgage. But, if you are comfortable taking more risk, you have other options to invest in which you *hope* will yield you more over the coming years. You also didn’t say whether the rentals generate net income and if so, how much? What is the implied rate of return on the equity you have invested in them? If you pay the mortgages off, you’ll have even more equity tied up, will the extra net income make that worthwhile? Maybe you should use the money to buy more rentals instead, if purchase opportunities still exist in your town. … this is less of an answer than a framework to analyze the decision, hope it is helpful.
There are many different methods to valuing a company or its stock. One could opt to use a relative valuation approach, comparing multiples and metrics of a firm in relation to other companies within its industry or sector. Another alternative would be value a firm based upon an absolute estimate, such as implementing discounted cash flow modeling or the dividend discount method, in an attempt to place an intrinsic value to said firm.
Many people talk about passive income and create the impression that you never have to do anything to keep that income going. The truth is that you will normally have to keep your eye on things if you want it to run smoothly. For example Richard Branson doesn’t run any of the 400+ companies he started but he goes over the numbers each day to make sure they’re performing well and calls the CEO if there are any problems.
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