6. Thank you pages: When you sign up for most blogging newsletters these days you may have noticed you are often immediately directed to a thank you page that tells you to check your inbox for a confirmation link. This person has already committed to you and considers you somewhat trustworthy, so it is a great time to offer them something special to take things to the next step – a sale. Maybe you can offer a special discount on one of your paid products or secure a special discount from your favorite affiliate product related to whatever it was they just opted in for. This is often called a “tripwire.” For it to work, the offer should be inexpensive and painless. Whatever you are offering here it should be value-driven instead of a hard sell. You don’t want to run people off before you even get started. With the right tripwire, you can easily justify and offset advertising as well should you choose to run ads to your opt-in freebie at some point.
Investing in bonds: Similarly, bonds are an attractive way to engage in passive income. Over a recent 45-year period, bonds funds, as measured by Vanguard Funds, returned 7.1%. Of course, there's no guarantee that investments in stocks or bonds will always work out well, investing in them is by far the surest way to generate money through passive income.
My returns are based on full cash purchase of the properties, as it is hard to compare the attractiveness of properties at different price ranges when only calculating down payment or properties that need very little rehab/updates. I did think about the scores assigned to each factor, but I believe tax deductions are a SIGNIFICANT factor when comparing passive income steams.
If you need cash flow, and the dividend doesn’t meet your needs, sell a little appreciated stock. (or keep a CD ladder rolling and leave your stock alone). At the risk of repeating myself, whether you take cash out of your portfolio in the form of “rent”, dividend, interest, cap gain, laddered CD…., etc. The arithmetic doesn’t change. You are still taking cash out of your portfolio. I’m just pointing out that we shouldn’t let the tail wag the dog. IOW, the primary goal is to grow the long term value of your portfolio, after tax. Period. All other goals are secondary.

Do you know the importance of “Residual income”? Let this sink in for a moment or two; The average millionaire has at last three streams of income and I can guarantee one of them is residual income. But, what’s the big deal? Well, this is capitalism we are talking about. It only really matters if you’re perhaps an entrepreneur and pondering the thoughts of truly making it big. Even if you’re simply trying to make a few extra bucks online, monthly recurring (residual) income is definitely the way to go. Check it out!
I guess I just don’t understand why the specific importance of focusing on “dividends” instead of focusing on the total return of your investment, including stock appreciation. I don’t really care if a company decides to issue a dividend or not; presumably, if they don’t issue a dividend, then they’re doing other things to increase the value of the company, which will be reflected in the stock price of the company. As an investor, I can make money by selling a percentage of my holdings or collecting dividends, and I don’t really care how that’s divided up – it’s an artificial distinction.

Opportunity cost is the basic concept at the heart of residual income. Opportunity cost refers to what you are giving up to use an asset for a particular project or investment. Let's say you start with $100,000 cash in your stock portfolio and grew that money to $104,000 by spending only a few hours per month trading stocks. Now $4,000 in profit may look just fine when you consider that you only worked, say, 20 hours for it in total. However, once you consider your opportunity cost, your little hobby will not look nearly as profitable. If banks are paying six percent for risk-free certificates of deposit, your $100,000 would have grown to $106,000 simply by depositing it in a bank. Your opportunity cost is $6,000
With a passive income stream, it’s not only about financial freedom. Instead, you have created something that matters. Yes, you will have to step out of your comfort zone in the beginning and take a risk. The most important aspect of obtaining passive income is a positive mindset. If you truly feel you can accomplish your dream, believe me, you can. The committed positive mindset will help you get there and reach the potential you know you’re capable of.
I am 30 years old and am retired. Previously, I made a modest salary as an Army officer. I own three duplexes and a quadplex in central Texas (10 rental units in all), and each of the properties provide me with net rental yields in excess of 15%. The last deal is actually an infinite return as my partner paid the down payment in return for a 50/50 split on a property that would otherwise provide a net rental yield of 18%. The above net rental yields also factor in an excellent property management team who manages my properties while I pursue other investment opportunities. To date, I have never interacted with any of my tenants nor have I ever had to personally deal with any maintenance issues.
First of all, the difference between 2 and 5 years is gigantic! Second of all, there again is no quantifiable evidence to prove the efficacy of that statement. It completely depends on the person, the desirability of the good or service, the competitiveness of the industry, the marketing and manufacturing, and much more. To simply say that across all industries you should expect to break* even in 2 to 5 years is complete unfounded garbage.
I actually spent a year and a half working as an affiliate marketer (mostly selling drumming related products – lessons, kits ect). 5 years on and one of my one page sites (which I’ve not touched) still nets me about $150 a month. I won’t be retiring off that but only really now appreciate the reverse pyramid approach to entrepreneurship (working for nothing initially but later being paid without effort!)
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If you normally enjoy taking pictures or already have a huge collection of good quality photos that you personally took, you can cash in on them by selling them online. You can sell the same image several times and earn a steady stream of passive income from your existing gallery. You can even use your iPhone to conveniently take pictures, wherever you are.
2. eBooks: As bloggers, we solve problems. Think about some of your most popular posts or the questions your readers are always asking you about. Could you expand on those posts to create a short eBook you could make available for sale? Could you do the same with answers to those FAQs? eBooks are inexpensive offerings and a great way to dip your toes into the world of product creation. You can not only offer them for sale on your own site, but also on Amazon Kindle.
I guess I just don’t understand why the specific importance of focusing on “dividends” instead of focusing on the total return of your investment, including stock appreciation. I don’t really care if a company decides to issue a dividend or not; presumably, if they don’t issue a dividend, then they’re doing other things to increase the value of the company, which will be reflected in the stock price of the company. As an investor, I can make money by selling a percentage of my holdings or collecting dividends, and I don’t really care how that’s divided up – it’s an artificial distinction.
P.S. I also fail to understand your fascination with real estate. Granted we’ve had some impressive spikes along the way, especially with once in a life time bubble we just went through. But over the long term (see Case Shiller real estate chart for last 100 years ) real estate tends to just track inflation. Why would you sacrifice stock market returns for a vehicle that historically hasn’t shown a real return?
The churn rate of downlines is only exceeded by the churn rate of customers (that aren’t already participating in the MLM of course). Sure, Aunt Mary may give you an initial sale just to get you started, but eventually even she stops buying. But those few sales, plus the other expenses MLMs charge their reps, is enough to sustain the corporation. However, this system is only sustainable if the rep force continues to turnover.

Buy side Control premium Demerger Divestment Drag-along right Management due diligence Managerial entrenchment Minority discount Pitch book Pre-emption right Proxy fight Post-merger integration Sell side Shareholder rights plan Special-purpose entity Special situation Squeeze-out Staggered board of directors Stock swap Super-majority amendment Tag-along right Takeover Reverse Tender offer


First: I understand why you would say that such investments are restricted to only accredited investors, because generally, that’s true. There are means, under federal securities regulations and Blue Sky laws in each state, to sell interests to non-accredited investors – but usually those means are so heavily regulated and involve disclosures so similar to cumbersome registration requirements that it is not worth it for the seller to offer to non-accredited investors.
But what if ABC evaluates its prospective investments based on the return on investment percentage instead? In this case, the Idaho investment center is currently generating a return on investment of 18%, so making a new investment that will generate a 16% return will reduce the facility's overall return on investment to 17.8% ($196,000 total profit / $1.1 million total investment) - which might be grounds for rejecting the proposed investment.
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