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That income is considered residual income because as long as the apartment is rented and the rent is collected, the income is earned without additional effort. The effort came when the property was purchased and a tenant was found. Each month after that, the money automatically is paid without buying the apartment again or finding the same tenant each month.


During that time I’ve met many top earners who you would think had achieved the mythical walk away income, but guess what…? They are still working today, some in their 2nd or 3rd company since I’ve known them! So where is the walk away income? I say it doesn’t exist. I have known reps who have had 100’s of thousands of distributors on their teams at one time and now they are rebuilding and doing it all over again still promoting walk away income. It makes me want to scream! They can’t see that 99.9% of the people can’t do what they do and they can’t even achieve the mythical income. – Source Ezinearticles.com
According to Uncle Sam, you need to be "materially involved" in an enterprise to earn active income. With passive income, it's just the opposite, as the IRS deems you to be earning passive income if you're not materially involved with a profit-making enterprise. By and large, expect income to be taxable if you are engaged in a passive income enterprise. You will need to report earnings to the IRS.
What are your thoughts on an Immediate Annuity as a passive income vehicle? I suppose it’s not a great investment since you never get your principal back, but the risk is zero and the cash flow is fairly good, approaching 6% currently. And, since you are guaranteed payments for life, you may not care that you never see your principal again anyway since you’ll be dead!

I wish I had more time to put into real estate. Given the run up since 2012, I may even be interested in selling my condo that I currently rent out. I need to get it appraised to really see what it’s worth, but I think conservatively it’s gone up ~50%, although rent is probably only up ~10% or so. I am bullish on rents going up in the future… mostly in line with inflation, or perhaps even slightly faster due to constricted credit and personal income growth which should provide a solid supply of renters. At this point, I just don’t want to manage the property. I’ll probably look into a property manager as my time is likely worth turning it into a nearly passive investment.


The return on investment of a specific department within a company can be calculated by dividing the departmental net profits by the costs generated by that department. For example, if the sales department generates $500,000 in revenue and carries $400,000 in costs, its net profits are $100,000. The return on investment can be calculated by dividing the $100,000 in departmental profits by the $400,000 in departmental costs, which gives an ROI of 25 percent.
If you normally enjoy taking pictures or already have a huge collection of good quality photos that you personally took, you can cash in on them by selling them online. You can sell the same image several times and earn a steady stream of passive income from your existing gallery. You can even use your iPhone to conveniently take pictures, wherever you are.
To create residual income, you need to create something that people will continue to buy on a regular basis long after you’ve created it. A house is a prime example of this as people will continue to pay rent for the right to live in the house. A business needs to have products that are sold over and over again rather than trading the business owner’s time for money.
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