I would consider it 50% passive because the portion that generates money from ads occurs at any time. I guess you could also view it as an upfront time investment, but now that you have a following, I’d imagine a lot of the passive portion of the earnings would still come through viewers even if you decided to take some time off blogging! Reading some of the comments here though (traffic dropoff), I guess it is less passive than 50%.
Index funds provide you with a way to invest in the stock market that is completely passive. For example, if you invest money in an index fund that is based on the S&P 500 Index, you will be invested in the general market, without having to concern yourself with choosing investments, rebalancing your portfolio, or knowing when to sell or buy individual companies. All that will be handled by the fund which will base the fund portfolio on the makeup of the underlying index.
Blogging has a very steep learning curve, but if you jump in head first and take it one step at a time (I recommend tackling only one confusing thing per day) and do one new thing each day to work on your blog, you will eventually get to a place where none of it seems confusing! (If you try to tackle too many new things at once, you WILL get discouraged! I urge you not to do this.)
Thinking of going the online course route? Then you might want to check out CoursePress. This plugin is easy to set up and allows you to create a full online course that site visitors can sign up for, complete assignments, take quizzes, and more. You have the option to create text, audio, or video-based courses, integrate discussion boards, and even offer video previews to entice potential students.
There is also an idea that we should work to build a passive income asset and then sit on the beach relaxing for the rest of our lives. The truth is that most people would get extremely bored with this scenario and will be eager to find something to do. That’s why the world’s billionaires continue to work… they love what they do and it stopped being about the money a long time ago.
While it sounds like an ideal income stream, there are more specific benefits of residual income. For instance, unlike a salary, someone does not need to remain tied to the same location in order to earn income. He can move halfway around the world and still make the same residual income as he would if he stayed in the same location as his business.
That opportunity was always there, but I didn’t realize it until after four or five people said, “Pat, your stuff is so good, I would pay you for it.” That’s when I finally took action. I began reading as much as I could about doing business online and listening to podcasts and reaching out to people doing it already. I connected with them and created an ebook study guide, a digital book that could help my visitors pass the LEED exam.

However, you should pick a niche and blog about that. If you're launching a money related blog, maybe it'll be about how to make money in real estate or simply how to make money online. Pick the niche and stick to it. If it's a diet and fitness related blog, maybe the niche is the Ketogenic diet, the Atkins diet or some other form of diet or fitness.


Personality -- Personality's great if your intention is to build a community around your blog. But newsflash: that's not the "right" way to blog (nothing is), nor is it the only option. My small business blog went from $0 - $2000 per month in just a few months, and it was pretty much devoid of personality. There aren't many comments there. I've never made an effort to change that. The posts are simple new and how-to posts. They're not opinions in most cases. There aren't many reviews. I never blogged there to build conversations. I blogged there to earn from my writing. And I have. On the other hand, my PR blog also monetizes rather well. That blog completely revolves around my no-bullshit personality when confronting PR and social media issues. On the other hand, AFW has personality injected, but is also more instructional than NakedPR is -- it falls somewhere in the middle. No method has really proved better than the others overall. It's all about knowing what the niche audience really wants (community vs news vs instructional content or some mix). Sometimes you'll guess wrong.

Thinking of going the online course route? Then you might want to check out CoursePress. This plugin is easy to set up and allows you to create a full online course that site visitors can sign up for, complete assignments, take quizzes, and more. You have the option to create text, audio, or video-based courses, integrate discussion boards, and even offer video previews to entice potential students.

It’s not about not working. It’s all about automation. I’m still working. I’m just spending the majority of my time on the things I do best and I enjoy most. I’m out there blogging and networking and bringing people to my site and getting them into my subscriber base where I can encourage them little by little to buy through my affiliate links and purchase the products I have to sell. I’m scaling my business by creating more products and more authoritative posts that contain affiliate links to great resources. My income isn’t limited by time.
There is also an idea that we should work to build a passive income asset and then sit on the beach relaxing for the rest of our lives. The truth is that most people would get extremely bored with this scenario and will be eager to find something to do. That’s why the world’s billionaires continue to work… they love what they do and it stopped being about the money a long time ago.

A very thoughtful list here. Another relevant book published this year is “Retirement Planning for Young Physicians” by Dr. Ralph Crew. It covers many of the topics discussed here from the perspective of a physician who has successfully saved and retired. The book adds a lot to these discussions with a focus on the importance of lifestyle choices, as well as a realistic (though sobering) view of likely future physician income trends and how to plan accordingly for retirement.

Once people find success, what commonly happens is they don’t believe that they deserve it or they believe it was accidental, and that’s crept into my head a few times. It’s a very debilitating thing. You start to doubt and you stop working and you stop believing in yourself and you stop putting as much effort in. But I also have a great group of friends who help me with those feelings, and just realizing how many people’s lives I’ve touched and all the notes I get help. That’s why I have that large 5’x5’ space on my wall with notes on it saying “Thanks, Pat,” “Thanks, Pat.” I have a folder in my inbox just for testimonials of what I’ve done — it helps me remember that I’m actually making a difference, and it’s not accidental, this success.
So imagine this scenario: You get a brilliant idea for a mobile app you would like to make. You either need to know how to make it, or pay a programmer to do it instead. If you don’t have the cash, well good thing that you have a blog which earns you money through affiliate marketing commission, product reviews, as well as a the YouTube videos slowly piling up money from advertisement, and don't forget about the money from the online course and eBooks you sell.
Another benefit of residual income is that, if the income stream is large enough, one does not need the main focus of his life to be on making enough money to survive. Having a comfortable and continuous level of residual income opens up more opportunities to travel, look into other business opportunities, and even take the time to indulge in his hobbies.
and implement the residual income model. However, we can simplify the model by using the same multistage approach we used for DDM and free cash flow models. We'll forecast residual income over a short-term horizon (e.g., five years) and then make some simplifying assumptions about the pattern of residual income growth over the long term after five years. Continuing residual income is the residual income that is expected over the long term.
But what he’s most well-known for is being the mastermind behind the SmartPassiveIncome blog and podcast, the latter of which just reached its 10 millionth download yesterday. Last month he shared his tips on how to make passive income. Below, he tells us about his personal journey. (He also says you can say hi to him on Twitter and he’ll say hi back.)
What you should know, though, is that book sales on Amazon are still massively fruitful. Founded in 1999, Amazon was the original online book retailer, but they've expanded exponentially into a store that sells just about anything. Amazingly, Amazon sales currently account for 43% of all online purchases. 25% of all US adults are Amazon Prime customers, and they ship 1.6 million packages every day.
The Millionaire Fastlane – The author challenges the notion that the ideal life is to get a job, save slowly, retire old, and then have enough money to last the rest of your lifetime. He states that true wealth is having freedom, friends and family, and good health. His teaching has obviously rubbed off on me quite a bit. He challenges you to no longer be a consumer, but to think like a producer. Create and produce, become an entrepreneur, and that will put you on the fast lane to true wealth.

"The majority of people I see who are interested in passive income and pursuing it, haven't learned how to create value in the first place. They're just trying to do gimmicks and tricks and formulas. They're trying to do the automation part, but they've missed the point that the automation only spits off cash if it's based first on automating something that actually creates value. If you automate something that is worthless---or worse than worthless, a scam -- it's not going to work in the long run."

Some other parts of the book echo advice found in other bestsellers, with the section on how to create a lean startup being reminiscent of Eric Ries’ advice in Lean Startup – this by the way is one of the biggest lessons I think people new to the world of passive income need to realize…you can get started this week, with just $50, and still be on a level playing field with people who have a ton of money behind them (well, almost).
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