I have also to note one other aspect of site-building, which is a big bore: generally you have to spend inordinate amounts of time staring at the Dashboard (the administrative side of your site), filling-in countless forms, ticking all the right checkboxes, etc. At least for me, this stifles my creative drive more than anything. As a curator of a magazine-style review site, you want to spend more time finding awesome stuff to share with your readers, not grinding through the endless data-entry panels.
I generate all of my online income through advertising and that’s passive. As long as the traffic is stable, the blog should continue to generate income. The real test will come in a few years when we take a year off from retirement to travel around the world. (It’s going to be hard work to “road school” our kid.) I plan to post twice per week, one post about travel and one refresh/rework of an older article. One year is a long time and I’m not sure how traffic will be affected by this change. I guess we’ll see what happens.
Great post and comments. All your points in the article are spot on. My vote is Definitely NOT passive income. Launched my blog about 1 year ago without a lot of clear direction. After working with a productivity coach, we narrowed the focus (somewhat) and got rolling with more regular posts in March/April 2017. Small budget outsourcing on Graphics and SEO moved the needle a bit further. Google Adwords campaign a bit further. I just spent about 5 hours re-working a guest blog post for a food site, after already putting in at least 5 hours on the original version. Especially in the early years, there is NOTHING passive about sweat equity. Reducing the learning curve really does add real skills though, so you can hit the ground running and efficiently manage your time. Was interesting to see the vote tallies, thanks for the post.
This was by far my biggest return on investment. It took about two weeks to figure out how to format my book for paperback and get setup for Createspace, but this is nearly 70% of my revenue. It’s ironic because my e-book is $4.99 and my paperback is $14.99. I priced the paperback higher because I wanted to drive readers to the ebook, where I could update it more easily. What I learned, however, is that many of the people buying my book are parents, not students, and they are more familiar with paperbacks. There is also an incorrect perception that you need a Kindle to read Kindle ebooks.
So below is a list of my favorite books with a small description of each. I hope to have full-length reviews of each of these on my site soon. I also added a little section – a “to-read” list of books that have been highly recommended by others and I plan to read in the next few months. Feel free to add some suggestions down in the comments as well.
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Hey, readers. I need your help today. Please vote on the poll at the end of this post. My question is this – should I consider blogging income as passive income? In 2017, we are very close to being able to cover 100% of our expenses with our passive income, but we’re not quite there yet. I don’t count blogging income as passive income at the moment. If I count blogging income, then we’re there. I’d like your opinion on how I should count blogging income. Blogging isn’t really passive, but the income is. It’s somewhat difficult to categorize.


Hi! I love this post and I will be patient, but Amazon canceled my affiliate account too in a new blog. I didn’t even have enough affiliate links or too much traffic. We have to be patient and keep it as a hobby and maybe we will be lucky. I think if we want to instantly replace our daily jobs with blogging… will be a failure… So people do that very easy ! I really do not know how.
Then I learned about how people earn money without leaving their house, and even working from another country, and without having to spend too much time on it. This is where passive income comes into play. To be honest this hit me pretty hard the moment when I realized it - there are ways to earn money every month by doing almost nothing, and it’s not renting a house or apartment you inherited? First thing I thought when I heard this was “What can I do to make this happen, ASAP!?!”
Getting rich is almost every man’s dream, and with this guide and the valuable information you now possess, you can now actually start working on it. So next time you check your checking account, try to refrain from crying out loudly and come back here to read this article again and give passive income businesses another good brainstorming session. You heard it here first - passive income businesses can be the best solution for a home business and working on your own!
Jitendra's talent, skill, and style make him one of the most qualified digital marketing gurus in India, and in my opinion, shortly in the world. I know Jitendra from DomainX event , he was very active there and I was really impressed by networking & business skills he have. I decided to work with him and he delivers his best at his work. I really like his style of working.
Personality -- Personality's great if your intention is to build a community around your blog. But newsflash: that's not the "right" way to blog (nothing is), nor is it the only option. My small business blog went from $0 - $2000 per month in just a few months, and it was pretty much devoid of personality. There aren't many comments there. I've never made an effort to change that. The posts are simple new and how-to posts. They're not opinions in most cases. There aren't many reviews. I never blogged there to build conversations. I blogged there to earn from my writing. And I have. On the other hand, my PR blog also monetizes rather well. That blog completely revolves around my no-bullshit personality when confronting PR and social media issues. On the other hand, AFW has personality injected, but is also more instructional than NakedPR is -- it falls somewhere in the middle. No method has really proved better than the others overall. It's all about knowing what the niche audience really wants (community vs news vs instructional content or some mix). Sometimes you'll guess wrong.
Also, I know from my personal experience that when you only do something because you think it’s a money-spinner you end up nearly killing yourself to get the idea over the line.  I remember creating a careers advice site that bored me to tears.  Every word I wrote, hurt a little.  All 200,000+ words!  Do not put yourself through this pain.  I know I won’t ever again.
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