Tied into this point, I like how Scott discourages big dreaming from the point of view that when you try to solve too big a problem, you’ll normally fail since you don’t have the resources to tackle it – eg don’t reinvent say ecommerce platforms with complex software, instead create an online video-driven course on how to build online stores using WordPress (as an example!).
Already have something you are ridiculously good at and you actually know how to transfer your knowledge and teach the topic? You, my friend, are halfway there to becoming a course writer for some very popular websites. Online courses have become a real hit and have taken off in sense of popularity lately, as people are starting to understand more and more that it’s not always about diplomas and which school you went to.
Bryan said, "People who have become very wealthy through business have gotten very good at leveraging their time in their pursuit of creating value. They've done that by first creating value, and then automating the process of creating value, so they can scale and provide even more value to more and more people. But it starts with the fact that they already understand how to create value. They understand it so well, that they're able to create that value and then automate and scale the process of creating more of it.

This startup work is something that anyone involved in establishing passive income will admit requires some serious elbow grease. It’s the great exception to the whole notion of “passive” income in that it’s decidedly not passive. And for the most part, this is acceptable. People seem to get on board with this idea. “Hey, if I just buckle down and do a bunch of work right now, I’ll be able to sit back and enjoy the fruits of my labor later.” It’s a simple enough concept.

I read from the publishing blogs that having a great cover and a great book summary on Amazon was critical. So I worked with Matt Chase, who is an amazingly talented artist/designer, to have the cover designed. People love the cover and I think it’s a huge differentiator for my book. You can reach out to him at http://chasematt.com/ if you’re interested in working with him.


Draft your first five posts. I like to have a few posts ready at launch time for a new blog. Do not write a generic "welcome to my blog" post to kick it off. Blah. What does that really offer? Nothing. Put up a temporary post if the site is up pre-launch if you want to build some anticipation, but if you're ready for launch now then get right down to business.
The net operating income is the amount of money that has been made once all of the person’s expenses have been subtracted from it. For instance, in order for an author to determine his net operating income, he would have to deduct the costs involved in creating the book from the amount that he earned. Designing the book cover, editing the book, and publishing the book are all examples of these kinds of expenses.
In the blogging world it’s common to hear other bloggers talking about ways to make income. One of those ways is by using affiliate links. An affiliate link is a link with a tracking code; when a person clicks on that link and buys the product you get a commission on that purchase. Affiliate links are a great way to make passive income (see how much I make with affiliate income per month.)
The downside is the content may not be on your niche. If you’re lucky like I was with the history niche, there will be others who write on similar, complimentary topics. There was one history writer who covered mostly the Wars of the Roses, while I covered the Tudors and the Stuarts. We worked together quite well to help grow each other’s audiences.

I would factor it in as a bridge gap. If you plan to keep doing it for 5 years, count it at 100% for those years. Then look at what the compound growth of your investments would be in 5 years, and calculate based on that number. I’m doing a beta version of a new course about mini-retirements right now with 25 people. And a lot of people are in your same boat, close to FI but not quite. So we work on different ways to organize the buckets of income to fill the gap for either a gap year, or semi-retirement. And create an array of backup options. 🙂


I would consider it 50% passive because the portion that generates money from ads occurs at any time. I guess you could also view it as an upfront time investment, but now that you have a following, I’d imagine a lot of the passive portion of the earnings would still come through viewers even if you decided to take some time off blogging! Reading some of the comments here though (traffic dropoff), I guess it is less passive than 50%.
Residual income will continue beyond a specified earnings horizon depending on the fortunes of the industry, as well as on the sustainability of a specific firm's competitive prospects over the longer term. The projected rate at which residual income is expected to fade over the life cycle of the firm is captured by a persistence factor, w, which is between zero and one.
Residual income is income that a person continues to make after the work he has put into a project has been completed. Residual income is different from linear income in that linear income refers to someone’s salary. Salaries are paid based on the number of hours someone works in the present, rather than the royalties someone can earn on work that was done in the past. To explore this concept, consider the following residual income definition.

This lesson of repackaging, proved transformational for my second information product all those years ago.  I took a treasure trove of writing and turned it into several multimedia forms, including audio and video.  I was then able to sell the course as a multimedia driven training program.  It allowed me to charge 4 times the price (of an already expensive ebook), and dramatically boost conversions.
×