Self-hosting -- If your goal is to earn money through your blog, this is non-negotiable. Host it yourself (and yes, that means paying for a domain registration and hosting account). Personally I recommend GoDaddy for domains and HostGator for hosting. They're the combination I use for the majority of my blogs. Why is this important? Because if you want to effectively monetize your blog, you need complete control over monetization options and access to thorough site statistics. The easiest way to guarantee access to both is to host your blog yourself.
You can also resell digital products created by others. This is a good option if you don’t have the time to create an ebook or something but still want to earn passive money. Basically, you sign up for an affiliate account with someone who’s created a digital product (ebook, guide, online course, WordPress theme or plugin, etc) and build a site to promote that product. You can either sell it directly on your site or sell it via affiliate links to the primary seller’s site. If you make a sale, you’ll earn a commission.
Fox’s book is a little outdated now, but the alternative passive income streams he mentions includes straight up blogging (with the advertising and affiliate marketing as the natural monetization strategy), but also podcasting (don’t agree with this so much as a direct revenue stream) and vlogging (video blogging / web TV, whatever you want to call it).
This might be a weird one, but signing up for Uber (if it is available in your country) can be an amazing way to generate income by doing what you already do on a daily basis. If you drive a car and you have one you use every day, then picking up people that are along your way that give you cash for dropping them off somewhere nearby is, well, unheard of.
I would not have read this post now if I could’ve slept. I’m glad I read it though because I have heard how easy and fast you can make “passive” income and not have to work many times. I am not one to spend on a lot of programs but I am finally realizing how much work is involved in getting to a point where you only work a few hours a week and make a good living.

I thought I was done, but my sales went up actually, because I think people saw there were guides there and looked to see what else was there, and I was able to price lower because I’m just Pat and they’re a company with overhead. So my guide, which was $29.99 at that time, was outselling their other guide because their guide was in the $100 range, and I think people resonated with me and my story: Hey, I’m Pat, I’m just like you. I created the guide that I wished was available when I took the exam.

I would factor it in as a bridge gap. If you plan to keep doing it for 5 years, count it at 100% for those years. Then look at what the compound growth of your investments would be in 5 years, and calculate based on that number. I’m doing a beta version of a new course about mini-retirements right now with 25 people. And a lot of people are in your same boat, close to FI but not quite. So we work on different ways to organize the buckets of income to fill the gap for either a gap year, or semi-retirement. And create an array of backup options. 🙂

“Let me remind you again that when you put a book out there, you are a published author in a space where you are an expert. Your book becomes the ultimate business card, not to mention a source of ongoing revenue. Did someone say “ongoing revenue?”. Who does not need to make some extra money on a regular basis? Realize that this book will take some work to complete once, but thereafter it exists forever – working to bring you royalty checks five, ten, twenty years from now. Money will be consistently flowing into your bank account. If you write a good book that provides real value, then you realistically have a revenue stream which will bring income for decades to come.”

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