It takes a special kind of person to wear that many hats, and in my opinion, the current positioning in the information marketing industry of “anyone can do this” is just nonsense. Everyone I know who has been successful creating information products is a driven, uber smart entrepreneur. If you’re one of those people, you might consider it. If not, I would look elsewhere.
The job of a successful business is simple: it helps its customer solve a problem. Your customer has a need—their problem—and with your business, you’re offering them the solution. Sometimes the solution is a tool, a product they can buy; other times it’s a methodology you teach, a service you provide. Either way, your goal is clear: you need to help your customer solve their problem.
Most of the stuff I see sold on the report is not stuff I’ve recommended. What this has taught me is that you want people to click on an Amazon link because you have a high chance that they will buy something within the next 24 hours that will get credited to you. So your goal is for people to click on your links and not necessarily to buy what you’re recommending.
Writing an e-book is very popular among bloggers, as many have noted that “it's just a bunch of blog posts put together!” You will not only have to make an investment of time and energy to create the e-book, but market it correctly. However, if marketed correctly (through blogging affiliates in your niche, for example), you could have residual sales that last a very long time.

I know subscriptions are a litttttlleeee controversial but hear me out: bloggers like ElephantJournal have been super successful using Wall Street Journals approach of providing 3-5 posts a month for free and then asking for a small subscription fee. This one is worth thoroughly A/B testing though, because if it impacts your session depth and overall pageviews, your display ad revenue will take a hit.
Thank you for sharing your advice on Amazon and affiliate marketing. I just recently joined Amazon and have been updating my blogs using your techniques. Hopefully it works for me like it has worked for you, granted I know now based on your experience that I probably won’t see any big income from it for awhile but it is really nice to know I am on the right track to some success in the future.

Do you know of a successful business that needs capital for expansion? If so, you can become something of a small-time angel investor and provide that needed capital. But rather than offering a loan to a business owner, you instead take an equity position in the business. In this way, the business owner will handle the day-to-day operations, while you will act as a silent partner who also participates in the profits of the business.
However, you should pick a niche and blog about that. If you're launching a money related blog, maybe it'll be about how to make money in real estate or simply how to make money online. Pick the niche and stick to it. If it's a diet and fitness related blog, maybe the niche is the Ketogenic diet, the Atkins diet or some other form of diet or fitness.
Passive income is the Holy Grail for online marketers. It's automatic. Effortless. But, not at first. In the beginning, it's grueling. I liken this to doing the most amount of work for the least initial return. However, over time, as your passive income begins to increase, your reliance on an active income plummets. That's when the real magic starts to happen.
But I hate the very idea of how the “kick back and do nothing” business opportunity is sold. *Residual* income and *Passive* income are not the same, so I agree with you there. I’d love to see a series that goes more in-depth into what kind of work each type of digital business needs, a kind of fantasy vs reality thing. (Mostly so I could have something to send to people when they ask me, as I’m not in business.)
I read from the publishing blogs that having a great cover and a great book summary on Amazon was critical. So I worked with Matt Chase, who is an amazingly talented artist/designer, to have the cover designed. People love the cover and I think it’s a huge differentiator for my book. You can reach out to him at http://chasematt.com/ if you’re interested in working with him.
For some reason, many writers I talk to are afraid of starting their own niche blog. They're afraid it will take up too much of their time. They're afraid they won't see a decent return on the effort put in. They're afraid no one will want to read what they have to say. And sometimes they're just afraid to start something new because they're not sure where to start. To those writers, I have one thing to say -- Get over it.
Blogging is truly the best job in the world and I am so glad I started mine all those years ago! I am not gonna sit here and tell you that it’s EASY to create a profitable six figure blog, but I am fairly confident in saying that it’s quite common to create a blog that makes $1,000 to $2,000 per month on autopilot with a year or two of consistent daily effort.
Investing in the stock market is a classic form of passive income. As you might know, with stock markets, there is some risk involved. But then again, virtually all residual income methods involve a level of risk, and you won’t find any idea that’s risk-free. In fact, stock marketing can be one of the least risky ways to earn money, if you invest smartly. The basic rules apply: Create a diverse portfolio, start with around $1,000, learn about the stock market, and create a back-up fund.
As for Mr. Tako’s idea of hiring writers above, it’s not bad. However, in my experience it isn’t great either. Managing writers can be as much work as managing the other aspects of the blog. They come and go and I found myself spending more of my time on tasks that I didn’t enjoy (hiring and interviewing). I also felt like I didn’t have the same connection with my readers.

This sort of falls between creating a blog and an online course. The information can be presented on your site for free with affiliate links or through a subscription. How you earn income here will vary, of course, but the idea is the same as the other methods described above: Create something once and continue to collect income for months or years to come.
(Of course, you can also always get passive income by buying-and-holding US Treasuries, which are paying out around 4.2%. The BLS just reported inflation at 3.6%. No one's going to get rich with that level of passive income net of inflation. And according to Shadow Government Statistics, the real rate of inflation you and I are actually experiencing---including at the grocery store checkout line, at the gas pump, and at the doctor's office---not the massaged statistics the government puts out, is actually much higher, perhaps up to 11%. So government bonds could actually be not passive income---however meager---but passive losses.)
You can publish a book in two forms: paperback and e-book. E-books are much easier to get published, and they’re wildly popular these days. They’re also convenient for the reader. After writing an e-book, all you have to do is set up an account on a seller, like Amazon or Nookpress, and start promoting your book! Here is a simple guide on getting your e-book published. As I mentioned before, if you already have an audience, such as on a website, that’s the best place to promote your e-book. This article will also explain how to set up a website.

This sort of falls between creating a blog and an online course. The information can be presented on your site for free with affiliate links or through a subscription. How you earn income here will vary, of course, but the idea is the same as the other methods described above: Create something once and continue to collect income for months or years to come.
One of the primary benefits of residual income is that it takes little continued effort to maintain. Passive income includes things like royalties received for creating an intellectual property such as a book, advertisement payments received for Internet traffic on websites or content you create, dividends paid on stocks you hold and rent payments. Creating residual income often takes a considerable amount of initial effort, such as writing a book or article, creating a website, buying a building and renting it out or researching and purchasing dividend-paying stocks, but after the initial effort, you receive income over time with little or no additional effort. This can allow you to pursue other opportunities while continuing to earn income based on past efforts.
One of his favorite tools is Personal Capital, which enables him to manage his finances in just 15-minutes each month. If you sign up and link up an investment account with $1,000+ within 40 days, you get a $20 Amazon gift card. They also offer financial planning, such as a Retirement Planning Tool that can tell you if you're on track to retire when you want. It's free.
Frequent updates -- Sometimes you just won't feel like blogging, and that's okay. Don't stress yourself out feeling like you have to stick to rigid posting schedules or that you have to post every day. Are frequent updates nice? Sure they are. But they're not always required. I mentioned my two highest-earning blogs (small business and PR) before. Both of them can go for months at a time without an update. In fact, I took an announced 6 month hiatus from NakedPR.com previously. During that break traffic nearly doubled, and income followed suit. Even here, where I try to post more frequently (even twice a day a lot of days), I see subscribers and traffic increase when I go a few days without posting. It's become pretty predictable. So go ahead. Feel free to take a break every now and then. It gives your readers a chance to catch up or dig into your archives (where some of your best content might be hidden away). Don't decide on a solid schedule up front. Play with it and see what works best for your niche and your readers.
An interesting story going back to my LEED book — when I sold that book the first month, about 20%-25% of the customers were people who had already passed the exam. They emailed me and said Pat, I wanted to buy this book from you because I needed a way to pay you back for all the information you shared for free with me to help me pass the exam before.

Interesting post thanks. I have had similar thoughts about the passive income model – it’s not “passive income” at all, it’s just a different business model where you do the same amount of work to build a product/service and support clients in a slightly less direct way than standard freelance/project work. There are also greater risks with the passive income model – if you are simply selling your time as a freelancer or WordPress agency, you are guaranteed to be paid for your time. Whereas you can spend months or years developing a product, service or blog in the hopes of attaining “passive income”, only to find that it doesn’t take off and you never get paid for this time. In theory the gains of a passive income business are greater as it is scalable and the amount of work doesn’t necessarily increase as you get more sales, but the risks are greater too.
If Uber was a thing in my country I would do this every day as you can earn enormous amounts of money just by driving other people to work and back home, while doing the same thing for yourself. This can turn out to be a fun experiment as it will bring you money, and you will have people in your car keeping you accompanied on your way to work and back home. It’s like a school bus, but better!
As you may have noticed, the residual income valuation formula is very similar to a multistage dividend discount model, substituting future dividend payments for future residual earnings. Using the same basic principles as a dividend discount model to calculate future residual earnings, we can derive an intrinsic value for a firm's stock. In contrast to the DCF approach which uses the weighted average cost of capital for the discount rate, the appropriate rate for the residual income strategy is the cost of equity. (Learn the strengths and weaknesses of passive and active management when trying to uncover the overall market's worth. Check out Strategies For Determining The Market's True Worth.)
They've delegated, automated, streamlined, systematized, etc. Not with the intention of sitting on some beach somewhere for the rest of their lives and watching the checks roll in, but with the intention of freeing up their time to create even more value that they're inspired to create, either by leading that business to the next level of greatness and service to greater audiences, or by starting a new business.
Within my first few months working I was able to bring in a good monthly income, which was great because shortly after starting my business, my eighteen-month-old son was diagnosed with autism. Obviously, my business took a back seat. I did not work regular hours for months as we were going through evaluations, lining up therapists, and emotionally dealing with what we just learned. I spent more hours doing therapy and research than working my business. Yet I still got paid. That is the benefit of residual income. I still got a check each month for work I had done my first few months in the business even though I was not working.
The advantage of making your publication part of the Kindle Unlimited program is that Amazon actively promotes your book to KU subscribers, who are likely to take a punt on a title if it catches their eye. This can help increase your BSR, bringing you closer to the top of the chart. And each time somebody downloads and reads your book, you get a fee.
Link-building campaigns -- My SEO-centric pals might want to hit me for this, but frankly I've found that most traditional link-building is a royal waste of time. Don't submit your site to every free directory you can find. Don't waste time submitting news releases to all of the free press release distribution sites you can. Don't post short, garbage comments on other people's blogs just to get the link back. Don't engage in link exchanges. Don't get me wrong. There are ways you can increase links early on that I do recommend, but I suggest them far more for the exposure value. Those things would include linking to other blogs from your posts (the bloggers often know who's linking to them, and they might come to check out your post -- it's a good way to start networking with others in your niche). You could also comment on other blogs and include your link, but only do this if you have something substantive to add. Otherwise you just look like a schmuck. The absolute best way to build links to your blog however is to simply create great content that people deem worth linking to. Remember, it's not just about linkback quantity. It's about getting quality, relevant links back from sites who cater to your audience (who not only provide link juice, but direct traffic).
I love how real this article is. I’m so exhausted at seeing headlines and articles that lead people to believe blogging is somehow passive income and that passive means your not working. It’s heartbreaking, but I’ve seen several friends dump their entire life savings (and lose it) to try and live off of a blog based on the reportedly easy and formula-like ways to earn six-figures overnight. One of my friends just lost his wife, child, and home because he tried to jump right into blogging for a living and didn’t front load the learning because so many misleading articles told him it would be easy. He worked off of infopreneur blogger to-do lists like “get a URL, “write lot’s of content,” and “promote on social media” to win millions of visitors in just three months. Thanks for keeping it real.
"Residual disability" is generally defined as the inability to perform one or more duties of your occupation, or the inability to perform these duties as often as before, coupled with the loss of a significant percentage of your pre-disability income. While "partial disability" is similar to residual disability, the ways in which benefits are calculated for these two types of coverage differ.
Mark Atwood, the author of this book has a vast experience in Passive Income and he explained the concepts of Passive Income from his own experience. This book uncovers most of the latest, important and useful techniques that a professional earner uses in his projects. It is a good reference because it shows you the techniques exactly. It's not the book with full of theories rather an instructive tutorial which involves you with the real thing.
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