Tied into this point, I like how Scott discourages big dreaming from the point of view that when you try to solve too big a problem, you’ll normally fail since you don’t have the resources to tackle it – eg don’t reinvent say ecommerce platforms with complex software, instead create an online video-driven course on how to build online stores using WordPress (as an example!).
I wouldn't think of a high yield savings account as a source of passive income but your savings should be getting something (less like Seinfeld syndication residuals and more like a commercial jingle residuals!). It won't make you rich but it's nice if your baseline, risk-free rate of return on cash is 1% or more. The best high yield savings accounts (or money market accounts) offer higher interest rate and there is absolutely no risk. CIT Bank currently leads the pack with the highest interest rate.

Speaking of audience, there’s a lot more I can do here. I can create an email list for buyers to join, and I can also publish other books and attempt to cross sell. I decided not to because I don’t want to do more in the college admissions business. The best resources are free and I’ve routinely turned down offers for college consulting or essay review because I don’t think I’ll be adding much value there.
I have a system in place to make sure it doesn’t happen. I have my wife who is helping us stay grounded and making sure my head doesn’t grow too big. But I also say to my audience, Hey, If you see me becoming somebody different from who you know I am or who I’m supposed to be, then catch me before I get off track. I’m not about buying a huge mansion, or really fancy cars. I’m more about the family and making it comfortable at home and going on family trips and creating memories.

Most websites say you should build up an email audience and give them early access and ask them to write reviews. I had no such audience. So when I launched, I emailed tons of my college friends, high school friends, and made posts on Facebook and LinkedIn announcing the book was out there. Some people posted reviews, which helped initially. I also gave out free copies to people if they expressed interest in being reviewers, but many of them never wrote a review :(


Investing in coins and collectibles: Buffalo nickels and Spiderman comic books are good examples of coins and collectibles that can rise in value, and thus offer opportunity for passive income investors. You'll need to get up to speed on the value of any coin or collectible under consideration, but once you do so, you're on the way to price appreciation on a commodity you'll be paying a lower price to buy, and will garner a higher price when you sell.


Generally, the maximum amount of disability income that can be purchased is 70 percent of the policy holder's occupational earnings. In addition, the period of time between the commencement of the disability and the payment of monthly benefits, known as the "waiting period," generally runs from 30 days to one year. When deciding on a plan, there are a few basic considerations to take into account:

Yet none of these people I've talked to who have this temporarily successful lifestyle seem very happy. They actually seem kind of restless and lost. I've had conversations with several of them to help them determine "what the purpose of their life is" now that they have some amount of money coming in from some little passive venture they don't even care about that much. It all feels empty to them.
Self-hosting -- If your goal is to earn money through your blog, this is non-negotiable. Host it yourself (and yes, that means paying for a domain registration and hosting account). Personally I recommend GoDaddy for domains and HostGator for hosting. They're the combination I use for the majority of my blogs. Why is this important? Because if you want to effectively monetize your blog, you need complete control over monetization options and access to thorough site statistics. The easiest way to guarantee access to both is to host your blog yourself.
Admittedly, there are 100s of books out there covering the exact same stuff, but what I like about this – and in a similar vein to Get Rich Click – it’s the comprehensive listing and side-by-side comparison of all the different techniques and tips that I freaking love.  Once again, I know all the stuff in this book pretty well now, but I still run over it frequently to jog my memory and use it to work out whether I’ve covered all my bases – kind of like a checklist in that sense.
×