Not passive. I suppose blogs have a “long tail” like any copyrighted work of art (book or song or whatever), but I don’t think it’s as easy to keep it monetized. That would be an argument for condensing and reformatting your blog posts to an updated, organized print or e-book. I think your traffic estimate is too generous, if you stopped producing current content.
Real estate is the obvious choice if you are going to make money on your money. I personally am not at the point where I can do any of this in a meaningful way BUT my parents are and they now own a couple homes outright and are collecting income from them to power their retirement income. It makes a lot more sense for anyone that has a chunk of cash sitting in the bank and are planning on slowly drawing from it because you technically still have all that money in a property (or multiple properties) and can sell them if you really need the lump sum of cash but you’ll earn great interest payments until you do that.
Ebooks are one of my favorite sources of passive income. Now, you can do this the simple way and just publish it on Amazon's KDP. Or, you can go all out and build yourself a book funnel. Book funnels are powerful, but they won't be fully passive. For example, if you do a free-plus-shipping offer for your ebook (converting it into a physical book), you'll need to create some one-time offers (i.e. extra training) and up-sells (i.e. an audiobook). But, a book funnel can be very powerful.
About Blog Hi, I’m the Passive Income Earner. I also go by other names, such as Canadian Dividend Growth Investor. I’m based in Canada and I’m on a journey to build a passive income with dividends. In this blog, I share my experience in personal finance and investing, including mistakes I made and lessons learned. Occasionally, I will also write about financial and investing concepts I learn. Follow this blog to know about my journey on passive income through dividends.
But, you don't need to go further than that. You can simply write it and publish it and collect the income. That's all. Send out a couple emails to your list (if you have one) or post it on social media, and there you have it. Passive income. Now, the amount of income you receive depends on the quality of the book you've written. How well did you craft the message? How targeted was the information to your audience? It counts.
The holy grail indeed. The best idea I know of to recieve an as close to as possible passive income (on the net anyway) is to train affiliate marketers. Several affiliate programs have two tier payment systems so in thoery if you can train 20-30 successful affiliate marketers who sign up under your name you can get a passive income off thier hard work. But you still may need to educate and motivate them to continue to work hard. – Adam
The net operating income is the amount of money that has been made once all of the person’s expenses have been subtracted from it. For instance, in order for an author to determine his net operating income, he would have to deduct the costs involved in creating the book from the amount that he earned. Designing the book cover, editing the book, and publishing the book are all examples of these kinds of expenses.
People consider me an expert now, but I still have to get up and keep going in order to succeed and to provide value. You don’t actually have to be an expert, you just have to know more than the people who are looking for that information.  That was the case with Green Exam Academy. I wasn’t a person who got a perfect score on the exam, yet I was seen as an expert because I was the one talking about it online and I had done the test myself and passed it.
Creating passive or residual income is the ultimate investment dream for many, and it can be achieved via real estate. In fact, savvy investors have been using real estate as a way to create residual income for decades. What exactly is residual income? Simply put, it is income that continues to be generated after the initial effort has been expended.
To create residual income, you need to create something that people will continue to buy on a regular basis long after you’ve created it. A house is a prime example of this as people will continue to pay rent for the right to live in the house. A business needs to have products that are sold over and over again rather than trading the business owner’s time for money.
Another benefit of investing in rental properties is the loan pay down. If you obtain a loan to buy the property, each month your tenants are paying off part of the loan. Once the mortgage on the property has been paid off, your cash flow will increase dramatically, allowing your mediocre investment to skyrocket into a full-fledged retirement program.
I wouldn't think of a high yield savings account as a source of passive income but your savings should be getting something (less like Seinfeld syndication residuals and more like a commercial jingle residuals!). It won't make you rich but it's nice if your baseline, risk-free rate of return on cash is 1% or more. The best high yield savings accounts (or money market accounts) offer higher interest rate and there is absolutely no risk. CIT Bank currently leads the pack with the highest interest rate.
Frequent updates -- Sometimes you just won't feel like blogging, and that's okay. Don't stress yourself out feeling like you have to stick to rigid posting schedules or that you have to post every day. Are frequent updates nice? Sure they are. But they're not always required. I mentioned my two highest-earning blogs (small business and PR) before. Both of them can go for months at a time without an update. In fact, I took an announced 6 month hiatus from NakedPR.com previously. During that break traffic nearly doubled, and income followed suit. Even here, where I try to post more frequently (even twice a day a lot of days), I see subscribers and traffic increase when I go a few days without posting. It's become pretty predictable. So go ahead. Feel free to take a break every now and then. It gives your readers a chance to catch up or dig into your archives (where some of your best content might be hidden away). Don't decide on a solid schedule up front. Play with it and see what works best for your niche and your readers.
One of the primary benefits of residual income is that it takes little continued effort to maintain. Passive income includes things like royalties received for creating an intellectual property such as a book, advertisement payments received for Internet traffic on websites or content you create, dividends paid on stocks you hold and rent payments. Creating residual income often takes a considerable amount of initial effort, such as writing a book or article, creating a website, buying a building and renting it out or researching and purchasing dividend-paying stocks, but after the initial effort, you receive income over time with little or no additional effort. This can allow you to pursue other opportunities while continuing to earn income based on past efforts.
Mark Atwood, the author of this book has a vast experience in Passive Income and he explained the concepts of Passive Income from his own experience. This book uncovers most of the latest, important and useful techniques that a professional earner uses in his projects. It is a good reference because it shows you the techniques exactly. It's not the book with full of theories rather an instructive tutorial which involves you with the real thing.
Similar to selling advertising, the goal is usually to rank for competitive search terms, but instead of selling advertising, you endorse different products your audience might be interested in, and whenever someone you refer buys, you get a commission. It’s kind of like the next generation of Amway, except instead of referring your friends and family to buy the products, you refer strangers who visit your website.
Sally is a mom on a mission. She is passionate about answering the question, “Can modern moms have it all?” In a previous life, Sally worked for nineteen years as a project manager and business analyst in London and Silicon Valley. She has a Bachelor’s Degree in Computer Science and a Master’s Degree in Business Administration. Since leaving her nine-to-five, Sally has published five bestselling books on Amazon (and counting). You can connect with Sally at sallyannmiller.com.
That’s why I think the whole concept of passive income sites are based on a fallacy that they are different somehow from any other business and any other money-making scheme. For one, you still have to put in a ton of work to make anything worthwhile. People argue that it winds up being worth it because you’ll continue to make money long after you’ve finished creating that online course or ebook or what have you, but I think that’s a faulty assumption as well.
Before you start working towards a passive income, you should have enough money saved up, that you can use for investments and costs. You’ll also need some money to fall back on. Residual income ideas sometimes don’t work, so you should keep spare money in case an idea doesn’t work out. You can eventually earn a passive income if you keep working hard at one or more ideas.
While it sounds like an ideal income stream, there are more specific benefits of residual income. For instance, unlike a salary, someone does not need to remain tied to the same location in order to earn income. He can move halfway around the world and still make the same residual income as he would if he stayed in the same location as his business.
The job of a successful business is simple: it helps its customer solve a problem. Your customer has a need—their problem—and with your business, you’re offering them the solution. Sometimes the solution is a tool, a product they can buy; other times it’s a methodology you teach, a service you provide. Either way, your goal is clear: you need to help your customer solve their problem.

Blogging income is no more passive income than a writer who writes books for a living. You might get money rolling in during times that you’re not working, from income generated from the work that you already did… but you have to work to make the money. Nobody pays you during the 20-30 hours per week spent writing/researching. The money comes after the work is published. It’s definitely not passive.
Another way to generate passive income is to invest and be a silent partner in a business. This is very risky, but with risk comes the potential for high returns. For example, several years ago both Lyft and Uber were looking for private investors to invest in their companies. Today, they are worth billions - but you as an investor would only reap that benefit if they go public via an IPO, or get acquired. So, it's risky.
​Self Publishing is mainstream today. When you purchase an eBook off of Amazon there’s a pretty good chance you’re buying a self-published book. Self-publishing is also ridiculously easy. I tried this a few years ago and couldn’t believe how simple the process was. To self-publish a book you’ll first need to write and edit it, create a cover, and then upload to a program such as Amazon’s Kindle Direct Publishing. Don’t expect instant success though. There will need to be a lot of upfront marketing before you can turn this into a passive income stream.
Blogging is a fantastic residual income stream (don't mistake "residual" for "passive" -- in most cases you'll continue to work as your blog, and its income, grows). I won't go so far as to say it's the best residual income stream for freelance writers (informational products like e-books are fantastic for earning more in shorter periods of time for example), but they are one of the more consistent options once you build some stable traffic. And stability is a good thing. You don't always get a lot of it when you work as a freelance writer.
Thanks for the great post. I have been working really hard at understanding Blogging in nature and I really hope to monetize as I go. I am also really excited about my wife starting out. Which reminds me. I could really use someone that can design WordPress Templates for her blog. Anyways… we are seriously going to have a close look at Blog Master Mind. Thanks again!
The job of a successful business is simple: it helps its customer solve a problem. Your customer has a need—their problem—and with your business, you’re offering them the solution. Sometimes the solution is a tool, a product they can buy; other times it’s a methodology you teach, a service you provide. Either way, your goal is clear: you need to help your customer solve their problem.
If your research really does determine that there is some amazing market niche that until now has miraculously gone unnoticed and unserved---dog owners who wish to help their dogs lose weight naturally, for example---sooner or later, word is going to get out that there's money to be made there, and someone is going to create a better ebook or info course or product that serves that market's needs better than yours does, and who markets it better to them than you do. You can't manage this competition while sipping margaritas all day from your paradise restaurant on Fiji. You'll soon see your market share go down the drain---just like all those Açai cleanses. . .
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