Great post and comments. All your points in the article are spot on. My vote is Definitely NOT passive income. Launched my blog about 1 year ago without a lot of clear direction. After working with a productivity coach, we narrowed the focus (somewhat) and got rolling with more regular posts in March/April 2017. Small budget outsourcing on Graphics and SEO moved the needle a bit further. Google Adwords campaign a bit further. I just spent about 5 hours re-working a guest blog post for a food site, after already putting in at least 5 hours on the original version. Especially in the early years, there is NOTHING passive about sweat equity. Reducing the learning curve really does add real skills though, so you can hit the ground running and efficiently manage your time. Was interesting to see the vote tallies, thanks for the post.
Investing in rental properties: Another form of real estate investment, rental investments (i.e. becoming a landlord) could steer you down the passive income path of steady monthly rent checks that you can use to pay off a mortgage loan on the rental property. After the mortgage is paid off, those monthly checks go right into your bank account -- potentially for years to come. 
About Blog No Passive Income gives information about how to build a passive income, together with blogging, SEO, social media, internet marketing and now also small business tips. Tips about blogging, social media, SEO, internet marketing, investing & online business. Follow this site and learn how to build an income and reach financial stability.
This is a venture that is growing rapidly. You can create videos in just about any area that you like — music, tutorials, opinions, comedy, movie reviews — anything you want . . . then put them on YouTube. You can then attach Google AdSense to the videos, which will overlay your videos with automatic ads. When viewers click on those ads, you will earn money from AdSense.

Even with Smart Passive Income as successful as it is now, the first six months were really tough because I didn’t have an audience. There were a few people reading and a few people leaving comments and the same people leaving comments. There was no growth. Because I just enjoyed writing so much, I kept doing it and then a year and a half later, it got to the point where it exploded.

Setup your basic pages. I strongly suggest adding an About page and / or Contact page to your blog. Share some information about yourself and why your background makes you qualified to write about this niche topic in some way. It can go a long way towards building trust with readers. Also set up a privacy policy, comment policy, or any other pages you feel would be relevant.
On the admin side, you can tackle everything like grading and reporting and it includes theme and shortcode support. If you require more features, CoursePress Pro is the way to go. It allows you to create an unlimited number of courses, supports 12 payment gateways, and includes all sorts of bonuses like course teasers, automated and manual assessments, free courses, media integration, live chat, and more.

In addition to the noted jobs, there are many others that include monthly residuals. Use this rule of thumb: Industries that offer products or services that involve "pay as you go" contracts or agreements often pay monthly residuals to sales employees. For example, alarm companies selling ongoing home or business monitoring for a monthly fee may offer residual income to those who sell this service. In some cases, jobs that involve referring prospects for services that continue month-to-month also pay residuals. Always verify that, regardless of the industry, a job you're considering does or does not pay monthly residuals. Never assume.

As I was writing the lesson I realized just how complex the structure of the system I use to make money with my blog is, yet also how effective it can be once it is set up. I won’t explain everything here – it took me more than four thousand words to explain all the parts to my students in Blog Mastermind – but thanks to writing it out in detail I came to a realization. If done right, affiliate marketing on a blog can almost be passive income.
However, depending on the policy, an individual receiving residual, rather than total, disability benefits may receive a reduced benefit or no benefit at all if her monthly income exceeds a certain percentage of pre-disability income. In some policies, in order to qualify for residual disability benefits you must first qualify for a period of total disability. You can purchase a stand-alone residual policy, known as an income replacement policy, or a total disability policy with residual coverage as a rider. The income replacement policy is generally less expensive than the total disability policy.
Basic marketing ability -- You will not earn a decent income from most blogs if you don't market that blog in some way. That doesn't mean you have to market aggressively or feel like you're whoring yourself out with a constant sales pitch (more on that myth later). The most important thing you'll do marketing-wise is actually completely on the back-end -- evaluating your stats, testing ad placements, and just overall optimizing the site.
However, when you lack the money, you need time. You'll need to invest the upfront time now in order to reap the benefits of automatic income later. It just doesn't happen overnight. So don't expect it to. However, you can do this without quitting your day job. All it takes is some sincere effort over a consistent period, and voila! But, to get there, you'll need to consistently burn the midnight oil or get up at the crack of dawn. Your choice.
The ABCs of Real Estate Investing – It’s a great overview of real estate investing particularly in multifamily properties. It covers topics on how to perform due diligence, negotiate a deal, and manage properties. It really focuses on the fundamentals – the basic calculations needed to be a successful investor. It’s quite direct and easy to understand.
Admittedly, there are 100s of books out there covering the exact same stuff, but what I like about this – and in a similar vein to Get Rich Click – it’s the comprehensive listing and side-by-side comparison of all the different techniques and tips that I freaking love.  Once again, I know all the stuff in this book pretty well now, but I still run over it frequently to jog my memory and use it to work out whether I’ve covered all my bases – kind of like a checklist in that sense.
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