Frequent updates -- Sometimes you just won't feel like blogging, and that's okay. Don't stress yourself out feeling like you have to stick to rigid posting schedules or that you have to post every day. Are frequent updates nice? Sure they are. But they're not always required. I mentioned my two highest-earning blogs (small business and PR) before. Both of them can go for months at a time without an update. In fact, I took an announced 6 month hiatus from NakedPR.com previously. During that break traffic nearly doubled, and income followed suit. Even here, where I try to post more frequently (even twice a day a lot of days), I see subscribers and traffic increase when I go a few days without posting. It's become pretty predictable. So go ahead. Feel free to take a break every now and then. It gives your readers a chance to catch up or dig into your archives (where some of your best content might be hidden away). Don't decide on a solid schedule up front. Play with it and see what works best for your niche and your readers.
An analysis of the firm's position in its industry and the structure of the industry will be necessary to justify one of these assumptions. The third scenario is the most realistic if we assume that over time, industry competition reduces economic profits to the point at which firms begin to leave the industry and ROE stabilizes at a long-run normal level. The strength of the persistence factor will depend partly on the sustainability of the firm's competitive advantage and the structure of the industry. The more sustainable the competitive advantage and the better the industry prospects, the higher the persistence factor.
In the past, most people wouldn’t have considered selling software to be a source of passive income, but I believe that’s changing. Thanks to tools like Bubble, creating simple web or mobile apps is easier than ever before. You can do a lot without knowing how to code or hiring a developer, and in the future, I think that’s only going to become more and more true.
One of the most popular affiliate programs is Amazon affiliates. It is very easy to sign up and you can start using it on your site right away. I set up my Amazon affiliate account around the same time I launched my blog. I didn’t make money the first year, but as my posts starting gaining views and better spots on google results, my affiliate income started increasing.

I don’t make all my blogging income through them. In fact, the residual income sites make up approximately 10% of my whole writing income but that doesn’t mean they’re not worthwhile. I don’t promote a lot of my content and I don’t use the sites as much as I used to do. I also have my private writing clients who make up a good 60% of my writing and blogging income.
It’s going to be a little bit tough in that I won’t be able to share the actual site here (to avoid an unfair advantage). I will say that the niche will revolve around PR writing — a specialty area for me, and one my research and experience has told me will probably monetize well (precisely the kind of thing anyone should know before starting a blog for income’s sake). I’ll hopefully find the domain name today to start the 3-month period now. I’m about to quit for lunch, so I’ll see what I can find during my lunch break and deal with the basic setup quickly.

PPS oh you thought I was done did you?!  The other parts of the book, although not truly passive income generation focused, are amazing too.  I know things like the low information diet and killing interruptions have made a huge difference to my success – and if I can try and get a little more consistency in my adherence to them, then happy freaking days!
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