Some other parts of the book echo advice found in other bestsellers, with the section on how to create a lean startup being reminiscent of Eric Ries’ advice in Lean Startup – this by the way is one of the biggest lessons I think people new to the world of passive income need to realize…you can get started this week, with just $50, and still be on a level playing field with people who have a ton of money behind them (well, almost).
The underlying idea is that investors require a rate of return from their resources – i.e. equity – under the control of the firm's management, compensating them for their opportunity cost and accounting for the level of risk resulting. This rate of return is the cost of equity, and a formal equity cost must be subtracted from net income. Consequently, to create shareholder value, management must generate returns at least as great as this cost. Thus, although a company may report a profit on its income statement, it may actually be economically unprofitable; see Economic profit. It is thus possible that a value deemed positive using a traditional discounted cash flow (DCF) approach may be negative here. RI-based valuation is therefore a valuable complement to more traditional techniques.
Mark Atwood, the author of this book has a vast experience in Passive Income and he explained the concepts of Passive Income from his own experience. This book uncovers most of the latest, important and useful techniques that a professional earner uses in his projects. It is a good reference because it shows you the techniques exactly. It's not the book with full of theories rather an instructive tutorial which involves you with the real thing.
Mark Atwood, the author of this book has a vast experience in Passive Income and he explained the concepts of Passive Income from his own experience. This book uncovers most of the latest, important and useful techniques that a professional earner uses in his projects. It is a good reference because it shows you the techniques exactly. It's not the book with full of theories rather an instructive tutorial which involves you with the real thing.
The second big takeaway for me, was to pick a niche you know, you find interesting AND where there is demand for your product – ie willingness to buy/pay.  A lot of people only remember the first part of this 2-part formula, and end up creating a blog on knitwear for kittens.  But it’s the overlap of passion and profit that Ferriss stressed so much.
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