There are dozens of ways to generate passive income. However, the option you select has to do with two metrics: time and money. Either you have a lot of time or a lot of money. Most people usually don't have both. But, if you have a lot of money, generating passive income almost instantly is easy. You can buy up some real estate and begin enjoying rental income. Or, you can invest in a dividend fund or some other investment vehicle that will begin generating a steady income for you.
Investment properties: An investment property is one purchased with the sole purpose of earning revenue. It could be a commercial space you’ll lease out or a residential rental unit. Not only will this type of investment provide potential appreciation and tax benefits over the long term, but it can also provide residual income in the form of monthly rent (after expenses).

The underlying idea is that investors require a rate of return from their resources – i.e. equity – under the control of the firm's management, compensating them for their opportunity cost and accounting for the level of risk resulting. This rate of return is the cost of equity, and a formal equity cost must be subtracted from net income. Consequently, to create shareholder value, management must generate returns at least as great as this cost. Thus, although a company may report a profit on its income statement, it may actually be economically unprofitable; see Economic profit. It is thus possible that a value deemed positive using a traditional discounted cash flow (DCF) approach may be negative here. RI-based valuation is therefore a valuable complement to more traditional techniques.


Managerial accounting defines residual income in a corporate setting as the amount of leftover operating profit after all costs of capital used to generate the revenues have been paid. It is also considered the company's net operating income or the amount of profit that exceed its required rate of return. Residual income is normally used to assess the performance of a capital investment, team, department or business unit.
Get your basic blog set up. This involves choosing a niche (use the Adwords keyword tool to find out if people are really searching for information in the niche first), registering a domain name, getting a hosting account, setting up your basic blog installation (I recommend WordPress.org), and choosing a theme (design). Rather than go through these steps in detail here, you can follow my instructions on getting WordPress set up over in our 30 day marketing bootcamp series for freelance writers over at QueryFreeFreelancer.com.

Almost all of these ideas require starting a personal blog or website. But the great thing about that is that it's incredibly cheap to do. We recommend using Bluehost to get started. You get a free domain name and hosting starts at just $2.95 per month - a deal that you won't find many other places online! You can afford that to start building a passive income stream.


A very thoughtful list here. Another relevant book published this year is “Retirement Planning for Young Physicians” by Dr. Ralph Crew. It covers many of the topics discussed here from the perspective of a physician who has successfully saved and retired. The book adds a lot to these discussions with a focus on the importance of lifestyle choices, as well as a realistic (though sobering) view of likely future physician income trends and how to plan accordingly for retirement.
I always knew it would take hard graft and a lot of time. I started writing three years ago, at that time, for no other reason than I wanted to put pen to paper. However, over the years my blog has developed into something I would like to focus more on and would like to monetise it. So can I ask, are there any good books or other websites etc I should be reading to help with SEO etc – I understand the basics but I now want to know more.
My advice for beginners – especially beginner bloggers with new sites – focus on your site content and traffic for a while, then add your Amazon links once you have a little traffic. So many beginners focus on making money from their links and sacrifice their content building in the process. Without good content and traffic you won’t make much anyways.
With that though, if we work smarter and not hard we can reap the benefits of someone else’s hard work and buy an already built online business that is earning passive income. Which is what I started to do and it worked for me. Sure I had to research and learn how to buy an online business and there is a slight bit of maintenance needed for each site but it too can be outsourced. Meaning if you really want to you can earn passive income and sit back on the beach. Actually right now as I type I am in Mexico, by the beach and surfing everyday. I don’t tell you this to brag, I tell you all this because you are right. Building a business, any business is hard! Buying one isn’t super easy either, but you can do it and you can earn passive income with very little work, you just need to work smarter and not hard.
Private equity funds: This is a collective investment fund that pools the money of many investors to invest in real estate, and real estate experts who have very stringent underwriting standards often run them. Keep in mind that these funds traditionally carry high investment minimums but can generate up to 20 percent of any profits earned (depending on the fund).
If you’ve got a book you’re itching to write, you can still go with the traditional publishing route. (We published our first book using a traditional publisher.) Whether your book is fiction or non-fiction, a publisher can help get your book into print and onto shelves in both online and traditional book stores. This is still a good route, although it may take more work and be more expensive than some other options.

Not passive. I suppose blogs have a “long tail” like any copyrighted work of art (book or song or whatever), but I don’t think it’s as easy to keep it monetized. That would be an argument for condensing and reformatting your blog posts to an updated, organized print or e-book. I think your traffic estimate is too generous, if you stopped producing current content.


The plugin works with all major payment gateways including PayPal, Authorize.net, and Stripe. You can even offer site visitors coupons or free trials. You can also establish any kind of membership system you want from dripped content to freemium to a full pay-to-access everything setup. It also includes a setup wizard, the ability to opt out of features, and more.
Investing in coins and collectibles: Buffalo nickels and Spiderman comic books are good examples of coins and collectibles that can rise in value, and thus offer opportunity for passive income investors. You'll need to get up to speed on the value of any coin or collectible under consideration, but once you do so, you're on the way to price appreciation on a commodity you'll be paying a lower price to buy, and will garner a higher price when you sell.
I would like to add, that one of the main reasons why you cannot leave your web properties unattended, is Google. Even for popular content, with time Google sends fewer and fewer visitors your way, if you stop pruning and updating it. There hardly is such a thing as “evergreen content” any more. If you do not update your existing content, you have to keep adding some new content, preferably — every day. That’s where the content-creation plugins with some automatic pre-scheduling capability come in very handy.
Tied into this point, I like how Scott discourages big dreaming from the point of view that when you try to solve too big a problem, you’ll normally fail since you don’t have the resources to tackle it – eg don’t reinvent say ecommerce platforms with complex software, instead create an online video-driven course on how to build online stores using WordPress (as an example!).
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