I no longer count traditional publishing as passive income because after you’ve spent half a dozen years pitching agents, arguing with publishers, and having your heart broken repeatedly only to make about a dollar per book, it’s not really passive income. More like overdue income. The responsibility that traditionally published authors shoulder is much too high and the cut far too little to make this even a profitable, let alone passive, income option for most writers.

​Affiliate marketing is the practice of partnering with a company (becoming their affiliate) to receive a commission on a product. This method of generating income works the best for those with blogs and websites. Even then, it takes a long time to build up before it becomes passive. If you want to get started with affiliate marketing check out this great list of affiliate marketing programs.


Hi Logan, thanks for perfect article on passive income theme! I am a newbie in this passive income thing but everything I read here seems obvious to me. Why not create a passive income, right? So I started googling about making passive income via internet because I like things connected to the web and I think that this will be a huge thing (it already is) and I found this article which seems that is probably very new but in the ebook there are great informations about passive income, at least in my POV (newbie POV). Is this a legit website or can it actually work? I want to expand on that because my 9 – 5 s*cks… Here is the URL: https://cashwithoutjob.online
Residual income is when you continue to get paid after the work is done. This includes royalties from books, movies, or songs and also income that comes from real estate or business investments where you don’t actually have to be present to earn it. For example, Bill Gates is still making a residual income from Microsoft even though he isn’t working there anymore.
You need to decide which machines you want to run, get the necessary licenses to operate them (you're selling items so you need to get sales licenses and whatnot from your state), buy the machines and a truck for the items in the machines, find a supplier of the products, and then finally you can secure locations. Finally, you need to service them periodically or hire someone to service them.

Personality -- Personality's great if your intention is to build a community around your blog. But newsflash: that's not the "right" way to blog (nothing is), nor is it the only option. My small business blog went from $0 - $2000 per month in just a few months, and it was pretty much devoid of personality. There aren't many comments there. I've never made an effort to change that. The posts are simple new and how-to posts. They're not opinions in most cases. There aren't many reviews. I never blogged there to build conversations. I blogged there to earn from my writing. And I have. On the other hand, my PR blog also monetizes rather well. That blog completely revolves around my no-bullshit personality when confronting PR and social media issues. On the other hand, AFW has personality injected, but is also more instructional than NakedPR is -- it falls somewhere in the middle. No method has really proved better than the others overall. It's all about knowing what the niche audience really wants (community vs news vs instructional content or some mix). Sometimes you'll guess wrong.
I do most of my work at night after they go to bed. Sometimes I can work during the day and I get a few hours to answer emails or do non-heavy brain activity, but it’s harder to do creative stuff like writing where I need large blocks of time, so I do that after they go to bed, from 8pm till about midnight or 1am. I do all my work when I can completely focus on work, and then I can completely focus on family when I need to focus on family.
For some reason, many writers I talk to are afraid of starting their own niche blog. They're afraid it will take up too much of their time. They're afraid they won't see a decent return on the effort put in. They're afraid no one will want to read what they have to say. And sometimes they're just afraid to start something new because they're not sure where to start. To those writers, I have one thing to say -- Get over it.
There is a specific tax definition of passive income, known as “passive activity” to the Internal Revenue Service. Passive income is any income you make without actively working or are materially involved. The IRS defines it as any rental activity or any business in which the taxpayer does not “materially participate.” Nonpassive activities, or active activities, are businesses in which the taxpayer works on a regular, continuous, and substantial basis.
On the blog aspect, you need to keep posting regularly, otherwise ultimately your traffic will tank (and so will your revenue). That can also be outsourced to some extent: you can pay people to write for you. But your audience are not morons: if you’re open about it they might be ok with it once in a while. If you’re not open about it: they’ll notice.

 If you’re starting out, select “Sell as an Individual” to avoid paying an extra $1 per sale. "Professional" costs (at time of writing) $39.99 a month, but you don’t pay the $1 fee for each item. If you’re unlikely to list more than 40 units a month, go for Individual. If you’re selling more than 40, it pays to use the Professional Plan. You can change your choice at a later date if you need to.
An analysis of the firm's position in its industry and the structure of the industry will be necessary to justify one of these assumptions. The third scenario is the most realistic if we assume that over time, industry competition reduces economic profits to the point at which firms begin to leave the industry and ROE stabilizes at a long-run normal level. The strength of the persistence factor will depend partly on the sustainability of the firm's competitive advantage and the structure of the industry. The more sustainable the competitive advantage and the better the industry prospects, the higher the persistence factor.
In addition to the noted jobs, there are many others that include monthly residuals. Use this rule of thumb: Industries that offer products or services that involve "pay as you go" contracts or agreements often pay monthly residuals to sales employees. For example, alarm companies selling ongoing home or business monitoring for a monthly fee may offer residual income to those who sell this service. In some cases, jobs that involve referring prospects for services that continue month-to-month also pay residuals. Always verify that, regardless of the industry, a job you're considering does or does not pay monthly residuals. Never assume.
The job of a successful business is simple: it helps its customer solve a problem. Your customer has a need—their problem—and with your business, you’re offering them the solution. Sometimes the solution is a tool, a product they can buy; other times it’s a methodology you teach, a service you provide. Either way, your goal is clear: you need to help your customer solve their problem.
Of course, you can make honst money in Internet info-products, or affiliate marketing, or other such areas where people tend to get drawn to "passive income" fantasies. But, to make real money over the sustainable long-haul, you must treat these like any other business. In other words, you must provide real value to real customers with a real need.
Possessing a team of like-minded people is one of the keys to success and is essential in any business. The results you achieve will be directly related who you surround yourself with. You may be in business for yourself, but you cannot do it by yourself, you need a team. A team that you can rely on. Engineered Lifestyles has the experience and can provide you with the team you need for success!
Under throughput analysis, the only factor that matters is the impact of a proposed investment on the ability of a business to increase its total throughput (revenue minus totally variable costs). Under this concept, the main focus is on either enhancing throughput through the bottleneck operation or in reducing operating expenses. This analysis requires a consideration of bottleneck usage by the likely mix of products to be manufactured, and their margins. This is a much more detailed analysis than is contemplated under the more simplistic residual income approach.
An analysis of the firm's position in its industry and the structure of the industry will be necessary to justify one of these assumptions. The third scenario is the most realistic if we assume that over time, industry competition reduces economic profits to the point at which firms begin to leave the industry and ROE stabilizes at a long-run normal level. The strength of the persistence factor will depend partly on the sustainability of the firm's competitive advantage and the structure of the industry. The more sustainable the competitive advantage and the better the industry prospects, the higher the persistence factor.
Insurance agents, authors, credit card processing professionals, multilevel marketing participants and actors are good examples of people who often receive monthly, quarterly, semiannual or annual residual income. For example, your job is to sell credit card processing services to retail merchants. A merchant signs a card-processing contract with your company. First, you will receive active income for making the sale. Every month thereafter, as long as the merchant stays with your company, you receive monthly residual payments based on the merchant's credit card sales volume. The more merchants you have, the higher your monthly residual income.
The paperback’s formatting could also be improved. I basically just messed around in LibreOffice on Mac to get formatting to work, but I wish I would’ve started with a tool like Jutoh, which is fantastic for formatting and publishing. My workflow was Google Drive exports to LibreOffice, and Google Drive just wasn’t good for editing once you cross 40–50 pages. In the future I’d like to format a better sized paperback.
Monthly residuals are a wonderful method of increasing your income, getting paid for things you did in the past that continue to generate money for you. Those who qualify receive a check or electronic payment every month based on work completed in the past. Many sales and marketing people earn monthly residuals by selling a product or service that generates income months or years after the original sale. For example, you might sell a life insurance policy with a 10-year term. The insured pays his monthly premium religiously. The insurance company then pays the selling agent monthly residuals — a percentage of the monthly premium — for up to 10 years.
Once people find success, what commonly happens is they don’t believe that they deserve it or they believe it was accidental, and that’s crept into my head a few times. It’s a very debilitating thing. You start to doubt and you stop working and you stop believing in yourself and you stop putting as much effort in. But I also have a great group of friends who help me with those feelings, and just realizing how many people’s lives I’ve touched and all the notes I get help. That’s why I have that large 5’x5’ space on my wall with notes on it saying “Thanks, Pat,” “Thanks, Pat.” I have a folder in my inbox just for testimonials of what I’ve done — it helps me remember that I’m actually making a difference, and it’s not accidental, this success.
P2P lending is the practice of loaning money to borrowers who typically don’t qualify for traditional loans. As the lender you have the ability to choose the borrowers and are able to spread your investment amount out to mitigate your risk. The most popular peer to peer lending platform is Lending Club. You can read our full lending club review here: Lending Club Review.
Fox’s book is a little outdated now, but the alternative passive income streams he mentions includes straight up blogging (with the advertising and affiliate marketing as the natural monetization strategy), but also podcasting (don’t agree with this so much as a direct revenue stream) and vlogging (video blogging / web TV, whatever you want to call it).
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