Some other parts of the book echo advice found in other bestsellers, with the section on how to create a lean startup being reminiscent of Eric Ries’ advice in Lean Startup – this by the way is one of the biggest lessons I think people new to the world of passive income need to realize…you can get started this week, with just $50, and still be on a level playing field with people who have a ton of money behind them (well, almost).
Blogging is a fantastic residual income stream (don't mistake "residual" for "passive" -- in most cases you'll continue to work as your blog, and its income, grows). I won't go so far as to say it's the best residual income stream for freelance writers (informational products like e-books are fantastic for earning more in shorter periods of time for example), but they are one of the more consistent options once you build some stable traffic. And stability is a good thing. You don't always get a lot of it when you work as a freelance writer.

But what he’s most well-known for is being the mastermind behind the SmartPassiveIncome blog and podcast, the latter of which just reached its 10 millionth download yesterday. Last month he shared his tips on how to make passive income. Below, he tells us about his personal journey. (He also says you can say hi to him on Twitter and he’ll say hi back.)


It's important to note that many policies use both an "own occupation" definition of disability and an "any occupation" definition. You may purchase a policy that provides own occupation coverage for a limited period, such as two years. When this period ends you must meet the narrower "any occupation" definition of disability to continue receiving benefits. Long-term disability policies are often designed this way.
I would consider it 50% passive because the portion that generates money from ads occurs at any time. I guess you could also view it as an upfront time investment, but now that you have a following, I’d imagine a lot of the passive portion of the earnings would still come through viewers even if you decided to take some time off blogging! Reading some of the comments here though (traffic dropoff), I guess it is less passive than 50%.
While I don’t have any direct experience with it, I know it can be quite profitable, especially in niches where you have high profit margins and low shipping costs. Vitamins and cosmetics, for example, are two popular drop shipping industries. Anyone can theoretically start a “store” and have dozens or even hundreds of products to offer within a matter of days.
There is a specific tax definition of passive income, known as “passive activity” to the Internal Revenue Service. Passive income is any income you make without actively working or are materially involved. The IRS defines it as any rental activity or any business in which the taxpayer does not “materially participate.” Nonpassive activities, or active activities, are businesses in which the taxpayer works on a regular, continuous, and substantial basis.
I won't announce the blog here (I won't use an existing domain name I have so you'll be able to verify when it was registered through the WHOIS records after the experiment ends to make sure it wasn't a longer-running site). I don't want to use this blog to push traffic to the new one (or any of my other blogs). Marketing will all be things you can easily do yourself. I'll use my networking environments like forums and social media sites. I'll follow simple PR and marketing principles to build some exposure, traffic, links, and income.

For those who prefer a more do-it-yourself style but still want their investments to be managed automatically, a robo-advisor like Betterment may be better suited. After completing an initial questionnaire, this program will automatically invest your money based on things like your risk tolerance and time horizon. They’ll even rebalance your portfolio when necessary – all automatically, of course!

The whole concept of passive income is kind of a load of hooey. Low maintenance income? Sure. I can get on board with that. But truly passive? Not so much. And I think promoting these kinds of online marketing businesses as anything different than your standard Internet-based companies is being a little bit dishonest to those who are hungry to make a better life for themselves.


Rich Dad Poor Dad – This is the book that launched thousands of real estate investing careers and is still one of the most famous real estate investing books of all time. There is lots of debate whether it’s a true story, but nevertheless, the concepts in it blew my mind when I first read it. It really speaks to the importance and value of not trading time for money. Here’s my full review.
You can control how many links appear in each post or page, how they look using CSS, and you can even custom select what products get linked to. The premium version adds on even more features like click reports, a bulk keyword editor, site wide keyword selection, link redirection customization, and more. The premium version ranges in price from $27 to $97.
Setup your basic pages. I strongly suggest adding an About page and / or Contact page to your blog. Share some information about yourself and why your background makes you qualified to write about this niche topic in some way. It can go a long way towards building trust with readers. Also set up a privacy policy, comment policy, or any other pages you feel would be relevant.
I spent about $45 on Facebook Ads targeting clicks to my book on Amazon. I paid around $0.30 CPC, and 155 clicks in total, but I couldn’t track how many sales were from Facebook, and I didn’t see ROI because I estimated 3–5 ad-driven book sales, which is at best $9 per additional sale. The other issue is that Amazon doesn’t tell you anything about who’s viewing your page or referral sources, so it’s hard to close the loop.
Keep in mind that most passive income business ideas usually become largely profitable after a certain amount of time, depending on the time and money you put in. It is important to know that some, also, never make it and fail - just like any other business in the world. However, some passive income businesses are more vulnerable and others are less risky and more prone to giving a good payout at the end of the month.
All written content on this site is for information purposes only. Opinions expressed herein are solely those of AWM, unless otherwise specifically cited. Material presented is believed to be from reliable sources and no representations are made by our firm as to another parties’ informational accuracy or completeness. All information or ideas provided should be discussed in detail with an advisor, accountant or legal counsel prior to implementation.
Ranking a website isn’t easy, and it takes at least 3-4 months, but it is rewarding as it brings in passive income every month. With decent traffic to your website, you can earn at least $100 – $200 per month. Those numbers can go much higher as you get more traffic and have keywords with a lot of revenue-per-click. You can also earn some money by selling affiliate products on your website, which is the next idea on this list.
On the blog aspect, you need to keep posting regularly, otherwise ultimately your traffic will tank (and so will your revenue). That can also be outsourced to some extent: you can pay people to write for you. But your audience are not morons: if you’re open about it they might be ok with it once in a while. If you’re not open about it: they’ll notice.

And speaking of not selling to everyone, don’t try to create products that are trying to speak to everyone. Don’t be afraid to get specific. For example, I’m no longer buying “how to make money blogging” courses that are meant to include beginners. Why? Because I can count on 75% of the content, if not more, to be about things I’ve already done – buying a domain, setting up hosting, setting up this, that and the other thing. I’m spending money on things specifically created for people at my stage of the game. And guess what? That creates a lot of opportunity for you in creating additional courses! You can create one for the beginner, intermediate and advanced user. That's a lot of income potential.


One word of advice, and something I intend to do once I have the money saved up, is to build or buy out property that can support apartments or townhomes. One tough mistake some people make is buying a pair of homes to rent out and they get a nice $2,000-$3,000 a month but that’s it. Buying a house is expensive and the rental prices keep lower income families from potentially coming to you with their money to rent. If you have an acre to work with (more or less is OK too) you should be talking to a contractor to build apartments or townhomes. You will make a little less per unit BUT your audience grows significantly because now you can have college students, single parents, older folks, etc. all able to afford your rental units AND instead of capturing one $1,000-$1,500 a month payments, you can probably charge $700 a month per unit (or more, depending on the market) and build maybe 3, 4, 5, 10 units for the price of a home or two and now you’re making something like $2,100-$10,000 a month. It all depends on what you have to invest but if you’ve got $250,000+ I’d highly suggest you talk to a bank/investor that can get you in touch with a good contractor to build on a property and get permits and take out a matching $250,000 loan (I’ve read that $500,000 is plenty to build a good amount of apartments to start) and you can fill up your apartments and make a killing every month. You’ll have more tenants to deal with but if you’re competitive with your pricing you won’t have a hard time keeping tenants or replacing them.


One word of advice, and something I intend to do once I have the money saved up, is to build or buy out property that can support apartments or townhomes. One tough mistake some people make is buying a pair of homes to rent out and they get a nice $2,000-$3,000 a month but that’s it. Buying a house is expensive and the rental prices keep lower income families from potentially coming to you with their money to rent. If you have an acre to work with (more or less is OK too) you should be talking to a contractor to build apartments or townhomes. You will make a little less per unit BUT your audience grows significantly because now you can have college students, single parents, older folks, etc. all able to afford your rental units AND instead of capturing one $1,000-$1,500 a month payments, you can probably charge $700 a month per unit (or more, depending on the market) and build maybe 3, 4, 5, 10 units for the price of a home or two and now you’re making something like $2,100-$10,000 a month. It all depends on what you have to invest but if you’ve got $250,000+ I’d highly suggest you talk to a bank/investor that can get you in touch with a good contractor to build on a property and get permits and take out a matching $250,000 loan (I’ve read that $500,000 is plenty to build a good amount of apartments to start) and you can fill up your apartments and make a killing every month. You’ll have more tenants to deal with but if you’re competitive with your pricing you won’t have a hard time keeping tenants or replacing them.
One absolute valuation method which may not be so familiar to most, but is widely used by analysts is the residual income method. In this article, we will introduce you to the underlying basics behind the residual income model and how it can be used to place an absolute value on a firm. (The DDM is one of the most foundational of financial theories, but it's only as good as its assumptions. Check out Digging Into The Dividend Discount Model.)

There are many people who get paid vast amounts of money to become the CEO of a company, play professional sports, or star in a movie. Earning a high active income is often a lot of hard work and requires a dedication beyond most of us. It’s also limited because no matter how much money you get paid you still need to show up to work to earn your money.

PPS oh you thought I was done did you?!  The other parts of the book, although not truly passive income generation focused, are amazing too.  I know things like the low information diet and killing interruptions have made a huge difference to my success – and if I can try and get a little more consistency in my adherence to them, then happy freaking days!
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