I would consider it 50% passive because the portion that generates money from ads occurs at any time. I guess you could also view it as an upfront time investment, but now that you have a following, I’d imagine a lot of the passive portion of the earnings would still come through viewers even if you decided to take some time off blogging! Reading some of the comments here though (traffic dropoff), I guess it is less passive than 50%.
In all reality, any business that involves selling a product is passive in some way. I mean, once the product is developed and created, you’re not actively creating it anymore; rather, you stand back and watch as people buy it and your bank account grows. But when you hear people talk about online passive income, they’re referring to a specific kind of business and specific kinds of products.
But I will temper that opinion, by saying getting your name in print can be great for achieving expert status for use in later ebooks/membership site promotions (your really money spinner), and for gaining new fans that your own distribution efforts can’t get.  For example, Ferriss pulled this off pretty well, using a book to drastically grow his online following / blog readership.
Writing an e-book is very popular among bloggers, as many have noted that “it's just a bunch of blog posts put together!” You will not only have to make an investment of time and energy to create the e-book, but market it correctly. However, if marketed correctly (through blogging affiliates in your niche, for example), you could have residual sales that last a very long time.
As we know, Amazon has invested (and still is investing) heavily in the navigation / recommendation functionality of their shopping platform: there is not only Advanced search and faceted filtering, but also features like “Frequently bought together”, “Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought”, “What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?”, categories/tags, new releases, best sellers, various public wishlists, registries…
Finally, market your available photos. Get active in photography forums, social networks, guest posting about photography will help you a lot. You probably aren’t going to get rich selling photos online, but you can earn some extra cash passively.  Say you earn $1 per month for every image listed and if you have 50 images available for sale, you may be earning around $50 per month.
It might all seem pedantic but I think the words we use to describe things are important. And calling a business passive when it really isn’t can set people up for disappointment and even failure. It’s not a fair description of the work involved. Sure, you might be able to lounge on a beach as money rolls in but only after you’ve put in many hours of work first and only with the knowledge that you’ll have to sit back down at the computer again at some point to invest further in your business.
In my case, I tried leaving the site in “automatic” mode a few times, when I did not have the motivation to post anything new. I found that my traffic, then my revenue, quickly tanked to half of what it should be. So far this has been motivation enough for me to keep writing, when nothing else would keep me motivated. But I have no reason to believe the “passive” part of the revenue would last more than one year. I can imagine revenue progressively going down, until it does not even pay for the server costs anymore.
New post sponsorship -- Companies appreciated the blunt honesty on the blog, so they'd hire me to review their products or even their websites. They knew up front they wouldn't get glowing reviews, but instead critical and balanced looks at what they were doing well and where they could improve. Sponsors had absolutely no editorial control or impact whatsoever (the only ethical way to incorporate sponsored posts in my opinion).

Stock dividends: Some stocks, especially stocks from big corporate standouts, pay dividends to shareholders based on the number of shares they own, and the percentage of the stock price on the dividend date. For example, if a company pays out 3% on a stock that's trading at $100 per share, you'll earn $3 for every share of that stock you own. Add it up and that can be good take-home pay as a passive investment.
Mark Atwood, the author of this book has a vast experience in Passive Income and he explained the concepts of Passive Income from his own experience. This book uncovers most of the latest, important and useful techniques that a professional earner uses in his projects. It is a good reference because it shows you the techniques exactly. It's not the book with full of theories rather an instructive tutorial which involves you with the real thing.
Sally is a mom on a mission. She is passionate about answering the question, “Can modern moms have it all?” In a previous life, Sally worked for nineteen years as a project manager and business analyst in London and Silicon Valley. She has a Bachelor’s Degree in Computer Science and a Master’s Degree in Business Administration. Since leaving her nine-to-five, Sally has published five bestselling books on Amazon (and counting). You can connect with Sally at sallyannmiller.com.
Possessing a team of like-minded people is one of the keys to success and is essential in any business. The results you achieve will be directly related who you surround yourself with. You may be in business for yourself, but you cannot do it by yourself, you need a team. A team that you can rely on. Engineered Lifestyles has the experience and can provide you with the team you need for success!
3. You’ve got to be available to your readership once you’ve created it; there’s truly no such thing as the completely “passive” income that Jon says most people are hoping for. My wife and I each do 20-25 hours per week of “free” technical support to our clients; it’s included in the information packages they purchase from us (which are the best in the biz because we spent 9 years developing and refining them). Nobody else in the biz does what we do BECAUSE IT’S TOO MUCH WORK!
The topic of buying and selling blogs deserves it’s own book though and is a very difficult skill to master I must say.  I rant about the greatness and simultaneous pitfalls of marketplaces like Flippa elsewhere on this site, but needless to say I think this is it’s own expertise; worth learning more about for a lot of us who know that starting a business (getting momentum) is a lot tougher than fixing up and steering an existing business to greater profits (maintaining and directing momentum).
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