While I don’t have any direct experience with it, I know it can be quite profitable, especially in niches where you have high profit margins and low shipping costs. Vitamins and cosmetics, for example, are two popular drop shipping industries. Anyone can theoretically start a “store” and have dozens or even hundreds of products to offer within a matter of days.

Given the growth in the sharing economy, your junk can start to pay for itself. For example, if you have some awesome vintage furniture inherited from your grandmother sitting in a storage unit, you can rent this out to photographers for their “styled shoots” which are becoming all the rage. If your furniture is more modern but you still can’t bear to get rid of it – perhaps a home stager will be interested.
Writing an e-book is very popular among bloggers, as many have noted that “it's just a bunch of blog posts put together!” You will not only have to make an investment of time and energy to create the e-book, but market it correctly. However, if marketed correctly (through blogging affiliates in your niche, for example), you could have residual sales that last a very long time.
Most workers earn income by performing tasks and receiving compensation from an employer or a client paying for services. Earned income is compensation made through active work that results in an immediate payoff. Residual income, also known as passive income or unearned income is money you receive periodically that does not require constant active effort. Passive income has several notable advantages and disadvantages with respect to earned income.
ABC International has invested $1 million in the assets assigned to its Idaho subsidiary. As an investment center, the facility is judged based on its return on invested funds. The subsidiary must meet an annual return on investment target of 12%. In its most recent accounting period, Idaho has generated net income of $180,000. The return can be measured in two ways:
That opportunity was always there, but I didn’t realize it until after four or five people said, “Pat, your stuff is so good, I would pay you for it.” That’s when I finally took action. I began reading as much as I could about doing business online and listening to podcasts and reaching out to people doing it already. I connected with them and created an ebook study guide, a digital book that could help my visitors pass the LEED exam.
Also: be prepared to work hard. Initially, you’ll have to work persistently on your business or website and not see any returns. Once you’ve built up your business or product to a complete level, and established connections, then you can expect to start earning money from it. (Note that not all of these ideas are businesses; some of them can be done without needing to open up a business).
That’s why I have invested to create a WP plugin, which gives a dead-simple way to create detailed Amazon product reviews for my blog RIGHT from Amazon product page: I find a product I like, I click a button, and … voilà — a draft post with a new product review is scheduled for publishing on my site. I can jump in to the administrative side to add some personal note, or I can move to the next product which piques my interest. Its akin to Facebook “like”, but instead of posting to my FB wall, I effortlesly get new content for my blog. Neat, huh?
Interesting post thanks. I have had similar thoughts about the passive income model – it’s not “passive income” at all, it’s just a different business model where you do the same amount of work to build a product/service and support clients in a slightly less direct way than standard freelance/project work. There are also greater risks with the passive income model – if you are simply selling your time as a freelancer or WordPress agency, you are guaranteed to be paid for your time. Whereas you can spend months or years developing a product, service or blog in the hopes of attaining “passive income”, only to find that it doesn’t take off and you never get paid for this time. In theory the gains of a passive income business are greater as it is scalable and the amount of work doesn’t necessarily increase as you get more sales, but the risks are greater too.
If Uber was a thing in my country I would do this every day as you can earn enormous amounts of money just by driving other people to work and back home, while doing the same thing for yourself. This can turn out to be a fun experiment as it will bring you money, and you will have people in your car keeping you accompanied on your way to work and back home. It’s like a school bus, but better!
Residual income will continue beyond a specified earnings horizon depending on the fortunes of the industry, as well as on the sustainability of a specific firm's competitive prospects over the longer term. The projected rate at which residual income is expected to fade over the life cycle of the firm is captured by a persistence factor, w, which is between zero and one.
The topic of buying and selling blogs deserves it’s own book though and is a very difficult skill to master I must say.  I rant about the greatness and simultaneous pitfalls of marketplaces like Flippa elsewhere on this site, but needless to say I think this is it’s own expertise; worth learning more about for a lot of us who know that starting a business (getting momentum) is a lot tougher than fixing up and steering an existing business to greater profits (maintaining and directing momentum).
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