Personality -- Personality's great if your intention is to build a community around your blog. But newsflash: that's not the "right" way to blog (nothing is), nor is it the only option. My small business blog went from $0 - $2000 per month in just a few months, and it was pretty much devoid of personality. There aren't many comments there. I've never made an effort to change that. The posts are simple new and how-to posts. They're not opinions in most cases. There aren't many reviews. I never blogged there to build conversations. I blogged there to earn from my writing. And I have. On the other hand, my PR blog also monetizes rather well. That blog completely revolves around my no-bullshit personality when confronting PR and social media issues. On the other hand, AFW has personality injected, but is also more instructional than NakedPR is -- it falls somewhere in the middle. No method has really proved better than the others overall. It's all about knowing what the niche audience really wants (community vs news vs instructional content or some mix). Sometimes you'll guess wrong.
Buy a small business: A local small business, like a car wash or a laundromat, is a great way to put money down on a money-making venture. Automate it so you don't have to be on the premises unless you're collecting money. Go into a local business with your eyes wide open - study the books, especially on income and expenses, and examine water and utility bills if your venture will be open 24 hours.
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At some point, you have problems with scale: you need to dive into advanced sysadmin skills to maintain your server up and running, or pay to have it done. Wordpress updates, OS updates, all of this is work, sometimes heavy works when your plugins start to misbehave. Let alone the occasional drill when your site is under a DDoS attack, or just stops responding for no effing reason.
The members and brokers that Brad recruited, as well as the members and brokers that those people recruited, were considered Brad’s “downline.” At the time of the divorce, Brad’s downline consisted of thousands of members and brokers, earning Brad a residual income of about $27,000 per month. The trial court was tasked with determining just how to divide the residual income, generated by Brad’s downline, between the two parties.
But I hate the very idea of how the “kick back and do nothing” business opportunity is sold. *Residual* income and *Passive* income are not the same, so I agree with you there. I’d love to see a series that goes more in-depth into what kind of work each type of digital business needs, a kind of fantasy vs reality thing. (Mostly so I could have something to send to people when they ask me, as I’m not in business.)
There is a specific tax definition of passive income, known as “passive activity” to the Internal Revenue Service. Passive income is any income you make without actively working or are materially involved. The IRS defines it as any rental activity or any business in which the taxpayer does not “materially participate.” Nonpassive activities, or active activities, are businesses in which the taxpayer works on a regular, continuous, and substantial basis.
If you have specialized knowledge in a certain topic, you can put together an online course to teach others. For example, if you have experience in real estate investing, you can create an online course “Real Estate Investing 101”. The benefit of an online course is that once you create the course material, you can sell it to as many people as you want.

Needless to say, you have to find a way to differentiate yourself from everyone else, but if you can, the income can be relatively passive. Chances are, you’ll still have to deal with some questions and complaints from customers about other people’s products, which I’m guessing can be quite a headache, but you don’t have to deal with manufacturing, warehousing, shipping, or any of the other headaches of creating the product yourself.
In addition to the noted jobs, there are many others that include monthly residuals. Use this rule of thumb: Industries that offer products or services that involve "pay as you go" contracts or agreements often pay monthly residuals to sales employees. For example, alarm companies selling ongoing home or business monitoring for a monthly fee may offer residual income to those who sell this service. In some cases, jobs that involve referring prospects for services that continue month-to-month also pay residuals. Always verify that, regardless of the industry, a job you're considering does or does not pay monthly residuals. Never assume.
Buy a small business: A local small business, like a car wash or a laundromat, is a great way to put money down on a money-making venture. Automate it so you don't have to be on the premises unless you're collecting money. Go into a local business with your eyes wide open - study the books, especially on income and expenses, and examine water and utility bills if your venture will be open 24 hours.
However, this comes back to the old discussion of pain versus pleasure. We will always do more to avoid pain than we will to gain pleasure. When our backs are against the wall, we act. When they're not, we relax. The truth is that the pain-versus-pleasure paradigm only operates in the short term. We'll only avoid pain in the here and now. Often not in the long term.

Residual income is different from a salary, or linear income, which is paid out strictly based on the number of hours a person works. Someone who works on a salary is often said to work “paycheck to paycheck.” This is because he pays all of his bills with his first paycheck and then must wait until he gets paid again to have more money. Ideally, someone will work hard building up a business so that he can enjoy the residual income once his goals have been met. Then he can work on additional projects while still earning money from his business.


As we know, Amazon has invested (and still is investing) heavily in the navigation / recommendation functionality of their shopping platform: there is not only Advanced search and faceted filtering, but also features like “Frequently bought together”, “Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought”, “What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?”, categories/tags, new releases, best sellers, various public wishlists, registries…
Obviously, these are much higher than you’re going to get with most other investments. What’s more is that you can choose a plan that matches your investment strategy, whether your goal is Supplemental Income, Balanced Investing, or Long-term Growth. You can also look at different real estate projects and choose for yourself which ones to invest in.
This is the basic mistake they've made: they've fallen prey to the belief that money and meaning are two totally separate things. They've chosen to make their money from something that feels completely meaningless to them (some business they care so little about, they just can't wait to get away from it and minimize their involvement as much as possible), which they hope will buy them the freedom to do something they actually care about.
I generate all of my online income through advertising and that’s passive. As long as the traffic is stable, the blog should continue to generate income. The real test will come in a few years when we take a year off from retirement to travel around the world. (It’s going to be hard work to “road school” our kid.) I plan to post twice per week, one post about travel and one refresh/rework of an older article. One year is a long time and I’m not sure how traffic will be affected by this change. I guess we’ll see what happens.
I wanted to specifically call out one particular strategy within equity investing that bears mentioning – dividend growth investing is when you focus on stocks that not only pay a dividend but have a history of strong dividend growth. When I was first building my portfolio of individual stocks, I focused on buying companies with a history of dividends, a history of strong growth, and financials that supported a continuation of both.
About Blog Hi, I’m the Passive Income Earner. I also go by other names, such as Canadian Dividend Growth Investor. I’m based in Canada and I’m on a journey to build a passive income with dividends. In this blog, I share my experience in personal finance and investing, including mistakes I made and lessons learned. Occasionally, I will also write about financial and investing concepts I learn. Follow this blog to know about my journey on passive income through dividends.
The only way to increase your income substantially, then, is to reach more people. The difference, put simply, is between writing an article and a book. If you write an article and sell it to the New York Times for $1 a word, you’ll never see more money from that piece again. On the other hand, if you were to create a collection of articles and sell it in a book, you may (depending on various factors, which we’ll get to) see money from this book over and over again until you keep it in circulation.
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You are a perfect example of what education can co-create Jon; and you wouldn’t be the person you are or the writer you are if you hadn’t paid attention and learned from great thinkers, writers, poets, and rhetoricians. They have shaped your soul, and it shines through your writing. Lots of people manage business and income — active and passive — but few do it with your educated brilliance.
Fulfilled-by-Amazon (FBA) - you set up the listing of your product, but Amazon store and ship your products on your behalf. Your products get to be part of Amazon Prime (which is a major bonus). Additionally, Amazon handles your customer services: dealing with refunds or problems on your behalf. Sound good? That’s why it’s the most popular option for total beginners.
During the trial, Karen offered proof that she and Brad had built the business together, and that the downline was the result of their joint efforts – not just Brad’s. Karen argued that the residual income from the downline should therefore be split at a 60/40 rate on a monthly basis. Brad, on the other hand, asked the trial court to value the business. Upon valuation, the court could either allow him to buy out Karen’s share or direct that the business be sold, with the proceeds being split 60/40 between the two parties.

The Total Money Makeover – Great book on getting your debt under control. When the average American has nearly $10,000 in credit card debt, his message is extremely relevant. While I don’t agree with everything he says, it did make me way more conscious about the power of not having any debt. After reading this, I ended up buying my next car in all cash. Read my full review here.
Not exactly, even though that’s what passive income pushers would have you believe. No, once your site goes live, you need to perform various marketing tasks like promoting your posts and interacting with people on social media, commenting on other blogs, and seeking out new promotional opportunities. Oh and any good blog out there isn’t just preloaded with content and left to stagnate. No, you actually have to write new posts, too. And even if you hire someone to write the post for you, it’s you who has to edit them, schedule them, and oversea the whole operation. All of these things are not passive at all.
Finally, a straight forward, honest blog post about earning a “passive income” online. Your time frame is dead-on, Jon, as I have been working online for about 7 to 8 years and just now feel like I am getting a handle on most of the skills required. The real truth is that most online bloggers or marketers have to master many, many skills before he or she can claim true success. Of course, that all depends upon how to you rank your success. If you’re a person who enjoys tackling new challenges, learning new skills, and has a knack for writing, then the online world is definitely the place for you. Just remember it takes a personality who is willing to persevere and who isn’t discouraged easily. That being said, it’s a heck of a lot of fun!
Investing in rental properties: Another form of real estate investment, rental investments (i.e. becoming a landlord) could steer you down the passive income path of steady monthly rent checks that you can use to pay off a mortgage loan on the rental property. After the mortgage is paid off, those monthly checks go right into your bank account -- potentially for years to come. 
That’s why I think the whole concept of passive income sites are based on a fallacy that they are different somehow from any other business and any other money-making scheme. For one, you still have to put in a ton of work to make anything worthwhile. People argue that it winds up being worth it because you’ll continue to make money long after you’ve finished creating that online course or ebook or what have you, but I think that’s a faulty assumption as well.
What Every Real Estate Investor Needs to Know About Cash Flow – The focus of this book is making sure that you have a deep understanding of the numbers that drive a good real estate investment. The key emphasized here is that investing for cash flow is preferable to speculation. There are some great case studies in the book for those who learn well using those.
I always knew it would take hard graft and a lot of time. I started writing three years ago, at that time, for no other reason than I wanted to put pen to paper. However, over the years my blog has developed into something I would like to focus more on and would like to monetise it. So can I ask, are there any good books or other websites etc I should be reading to help with SEO etc – I understand the basics but I now want to know more.
Financing -- Sure, it's great if you have money to invest in a custom blog theme, advertising, or to hire other bloggers to help out in the beginning, but it's certainly not necessary. In fact, my highest-earning blogs were all started without spending a dime over the domain name and hosting (and since several are hosted together, that saved on the startup costs after the first). You can afford $10 or so per year. If you can't, you probably need to re-think your entire freelance career before you start planning new residual income streams.
The Book on Rental Property Investing – Brandon Turner helps to run one of my favorite real estate investing sites, Biggerpockets. His book is written in the same easy style and with the same intent as the blog – to help everyone have an understanding of real estate investing. It contains lots of practical advice and it is completely honest in saying that real estate investing is not a get-rich-quick scheme… but anyone can do it.
If your research really does determine that there is some amazing market niche that until now has miraculously gone unnoticed and unserved---dog owners who wish to help their dogs lose weight naturally, for example---sooner or later, word is going to get out that there's money to be made there, and someone is going to create a better ebook or info course or product that serves that market's needs better than yours does, and who markets it better to them than you do. You can't manage this competition while sipping margaritas all day from your paradise restaurant on Fiji. You'll soon see your market share go down the drain---just like all those Açai cleanses. . .
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