Eventually, I’ll have to stop blogging altogether. Don’t worry, it won’t be anytime soon. I still enjoy blogging, but I just don’t see myself blogging when I’m 70. That’s 27 years away so we have plenty of time left. I really don’t know what will happen to our traffic if I stop blogging completely and just repost old articles. I suspect the traffic will slowly drop and stabilize at some point. If you have firsthand experience, I’d love to hear about it. My optimistic guess is that traffic will eventually drop to 50% of the current level.
Creating a product to sell is decidedly active, not passive. And selling other people’s products is active too when you have to build your own store and maintain inventory. However, if you use dropshipping, all you have to do is set up a store and drive was web traffic to it. Everything else is handled by another company and you walk away with a share of the profits.

On August 4, 2003, Brad and Karen Murray’s marriage ended. They continued arguing over their assets for another four years. Brad worked as an independent broker for Ameriplan – a marketing company specializing in providing discounted rates on services related to healthcare. As part of his job, Brad sold monthly memberships to Ameriplan’s discounted health plans. He also recruited other brokers to do the same.
Most of the stuff I see sold on the report is not stuff I’ve recommended. What this has taught me is that you want people to click on an Amazon link because you have a high chance that they will buy something within the next 24 hours that will get credited to you. So your goal is for people to click on your links and not necessarily to buy what you’re recommending.
Personality -- Personality's great if your intention is to build a community around your blog. But newsflash: that's not the "right" way to blog (nothing is), nor is it the only option. My small business blog went from $0 - $2000 per month in just a few months, and it was pretty much devoid of personality. There aren't many comments there. I've never made an effort to change that. The posts are simple new and how-to posts. They're not opinions in most cases. There aren't many reviews. I never blogged there to build conversations. I blogged there to earn from my writing. And I have. On the other hand, my PR blog also monetizes rather well. That blog completely revolves around my no-bullshit personality when confronting PR and social media issues. On the other hand, AFW has personality injected, but is also more instructional than NakedPR is -- it falls somewhere in the middle. No method has really proved better than the others overall. It's all about knowing what the niche audience really wants (community vs news vs instructional content or some mix). Sometimes you'll guess wrong.
Just because the whole notion of passive income isn’t all that passive, doesn’t mean you can’t build monetization into your WordPress site with minimal effort. You’ll still need to participate in all of the general site upkeep tasks like writing new posts, marketing, and site maintenance, but the money-making approach you take can be quite simple and require little work on your part once set up.
What Every Real Estate Investor Needs to Know About Cash Flow – The focus of this book is making sure that you have a deep understanding of the numbers that drive a good real estate investment. The key emphasized here is that investing for cash flow is preferable to speculation. There are some great case studies in the book for those who learn well using those.
Hey, readers. I need your help today. Please vote on the poll at the end of this post. My question is this – should I consider blogging income as passive income? In 2017, we are very close to being able to cover 100% of our expenses with our passive income, but we’re not quite there yet. I don’t count blogging income as passive income at the moment. If I count blogging income, then we’re there. I’d like your opinion on how I should count blogging income. Blogging isn’t really passive, but the income is. It’s somewhat difficult to categorize.
4. We do our own IT, website design and implementation, write all our own materials, do ongoing research to keep it fresh and develop new products and technologies, market, mail like madmen (our emailing subscriptions alone cost us $1,100 per month, but we’ve got a list of 15,000 after four years in the biz), and somehow manage to keep the dishes clean, food in the fridge, and love our 4 kids as much as we can.

Jitendra's talent, skill, and style make him one of the most qualified digital marketing gurus in India, and in my opinion, shortly in the world. I know Jitendra from DomainX event , he was very active there and I was really impressed by networking & business skills he have. I decided to work with him and he delivers his best at his work. I really like his style of working.
Generally, the maximum amount of disability income that can be purchased is 70 percent of the policy holder's occupational earnings. In addition, the period of time between the commencement of the disability and the payment of monthly benefits, known as the "waiting period," generally runs from 30 days to one year. When deciding on a plan, there are a few basic considerations to take into account:

Hey, readers. I need your help today. Please vote on the poll at the end of this post. My question is this – should I consider blogging income as passive income? In 2017, we are very close to being able to cover 100% of our expenses with our passive income, but we’re not quite there yet. I don’t count blogging income as passive income at the moment. If I count blogging income, then we’re there. I’d like your opinion on how I should count blogging income. Blogging isn’t really passive, but the income is. It’s somewhat difficult to categorize.
I know some people assume monetizing a blog is just easier for me. After all, I can use the "juice" of my existing sites to bring a new blog attention in the beginning. Others assume it's easier because I come from a marketing / PR background (although that's no excuse, since I teach you all about that here if you take the time to look). Still, I've decided it's project-time yet again (when is it not with me?).
But I will temper that opinion, by saying getting your name in print can be great for achieving expert status for use in later ebooks/membership site promotions (your really money spinner), and for gaining new fans that your own distribution efforts can’t get.  For example, Ferriss pulled this off pretty well, using a book to drastically grow his online following / blog readership.
I wouldn't think of a high yield savings account as a source of passive income but your savings should be getting something (less like Seinfeld syndication residuals and more like a commercial jingle residuals!). It won't make you rich but it's nice if your baseline, risk-free rate of return on cash is 1% or more. The best high yield savings accounts (or money market accounts) offer higher interest rate and there is absolutely no risk. CIT Bank currently leads the pack with the highest interest rate.
For example, say you watch the interview they did with The Minimalists a while back, you straight away start getting all these thoughts about whether minimalism is a good subject to create an info product around, or whether it could work as an affiliate site that links out to all the products on minimalism (and trust me there are literally 100+ minimalism ebooks out there that you could affiliate sell, oh the irony).
One of the primary benefits of residual income is that it takes little continued effort to maintain. Passive income includes things like royalties received for creating an intellectual property such as a book, advertisement payments received for Internet traffic on websites or content you create, dividends paid on stocks you hold and rent payments. Creating residual income often takes a considerable amount of initial effort, such as writing a book or article, creating a website, buying a building and renting it out or researching and purchasing dividend-paying stocks, but after the initial effort, you receive income over time with little or no additional effort. This can allow you to pursue other opportunities while continuing to earn income based on past efforts.
I know subscriptions are a litttttlleeee controversial but hear me out: bloggers like ElephantJournal have been super successful using Wall Street Journals approach of providing 3-5 posts a month for free and then asking for a small subscription fee. This one is worth thoroughly A/B testing though, because if it impacts your session depth and overall pageviews, your display ad revenue will take a hit.
Ranking a website isn’t easy, and it takes at least 3-4 months, but it is rewarding as it brings in passive income every month. With decent traffic to your website, you can earn at least $100 – $200 per month. Those numbers can go much higher as you get more traffic and have keywords with a lot of revenue-per-click. You can also earn some money by selling affiliate products on your website, which is the next idea on this list.
Ranking a website isn’t easy, and it takes at least 3-4 months, but it is rewarding as it brings in passive income every month. With decent traffic to your website, you can earn at least $100 – $200 per month. Those numbers can go much higher as you get more traffic and have keywords with a lot of revenue-per-click. You can also earn some money by selling affiliate products on your website, which is the next idea on this list.
Those who can reap the benefits of residual income have typically put in an immense amount of effort and time in the beginning to be able to enjoy the rewards later on. Residual income, therefore, does not result in instant gratification. Those interested in earning residual income must have a lot of patience and determination to work as hard as necessary to achieve their ultimate goals of a long-standing income stream.
Jon, you always keep it real and I LOVE that about you and your writing! You are so right! There’s always an amount of work that goes into creating “passive income” or becoming a blogger who monetizing with services and courses. Thanks for being honest about how long it can take to truly master the required skills. Frankly, I’ve done my 4+ years of undergrad and grad school and what I’ve been learning in the last 2-3 years as I’ve dug deeper into improving my copywriting and blogging skills by taking classes with yourself and other trustworthy mentors is giving me the best foundation to help me build my freelancing business and ultimately step away from my 9-5. For me, it’s all about who I work for, under what conditions, when, and for how much, rather than a “no-work-at-all” lifestyle. That’s totally unrealistic. And I appreciate you, as a well respected “Guru” yourself, for saying so!
If you are a photographer looking to diversify your income stream, putting together styled stock photo packages can be lucrative. For example, a package of 15 wedding-themed stock photos for $10. You can then market this to any bloggers or businesses who are in the wedding business for their use (photos of different engagement rings styles are super popular). Through this method, it’s possible to make a continuous stream of income off of photos you’ve taken once (similar to a licensing deal).

However, residual income typically has an expiration date, especially if it is being earned through a business. Effort must be continuously put into the business in order for someone to continue to receive residual income. Businesses must continue to market themselves in order to remain relevant. The best way to look at residual income in this sense is that it is a part-time job that earns full-time income.
While it sounds like an ideal income stream, there are more specific benefits of residual income. For instance, unlike a salary, someone does not need to remain tied to the same location in order to earn income. He can move halfway around the world and still make the same residual income as he would if he stayed in the same location as his business.
It’s not about not working. It’s all about automation. I’m still working. I’m just spending the majority of my time on the things I do best and I enjoy most. I’m out there blogging and networking and bringing people to my site and getting them into my subscriber base where I can encourage them little by little to buy through my affiliate links and purchase the products I have to sell. I’m scaling my business by creating more products and more authoritative posts that contain affiliate links to great resources. My income isn’t limited by time.
Admittedly, there are 100s of books out there covering the exact same stuff, but what I like about this – and in a similar vein to Get Rich Click – it’s the comprehensive listing and side-by-side comparison of all the different techniques and tips that I freaking love.  Once again, I know all the stuff in this book pretty well now, but I still run over it frequently to jog my memory and use it to work out whether I’ve covered all my bases – kind of like a checklist in that sense.
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