But I hate the very idea of how the “kick back and do nothing” business opportunity is sold. *Residual* income and *Passive* income are not the same, so I agree with you there. I’d love to see a series that goes more in-depth into what kind of work each type of digital business needs, a kind of fantasy vs reality thing. (Mostly so I could have something to send to people when they ask me, as I’m not in business.)
So as you can see from the above example, using the concept of residual income, although Company X is reporting a profit on its income statement, once its cost of equity is included in relation to its return to shareholders, it is actually economically unprofitable based on the given level of risk. This finding is the primary driver behind the use of the residual income method. A scenario where a company is profitable on an accounting basis, it may still not be a profitable venture from a shareholder's perspective if it cannot generate residual income.

Most websites say you should build up an email audience and give them early access and ask them to write reviews. I had no such audience. So when I launched, I emailed tons of my college friends, high school friends, and made posts on Facebook and LinkedIn announcing the book was out there. Some people posted reviews, which helped initially. I also gave out free copies to people if they expressed interest in being reviewers, but many of them never wrote a review :(
New post sponsorship -- Companies appreciated the blunt honesty on the blog, so they'd hire me to review their products or even their websites. They knew up front they wouldn't get glowing reviews, but instead critical and balanced looks at what they were doing well and where they could improve. Sponsors had absolutely no editorial control or impact whatsoever (the only ethical way to incorporate sponsored posts in my opinion).
During the trial, Karen offered proof that she and Brad had built the business together, and that the downline was the result of their joint efforts – not just Brad’s. Karen argued that the residual income from the downline should therefore be split at a 60/40 rate on a monthly basis. Brad, on the other hand, asked the trial court to value the business. Upon valuation, the court could either allow him to buy out Karen’s share or direct that the business be sold, with the proceeds being split 60/40 between the two parties.
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As you may have noticed, the residual income valuation formula is very similar to a multistage dividend discount model, substituting future dividend payments for future residual earnings. Using the same basic principles as a dividend discount model to calculate future residual earnings, we can derive an intrinsic value for a firm's stock. In contrast to the DCF approach which uses the weighted average cost of capital for the discount rate, the appropriate rate for the residual income strategy is the cost of equity. (Learn the strengths and weaknesses of passive and active management when trying to uncover the overall market's worth. Check out Strategies For Determining The Market's True Worth.)


The second big takeaway for me, was to pick a niche you know, you find interesting AND where there is demand for your product – ie willingness to buy/pay.  A lot of people only remember the first part of this 2-part formula, and end up creating a blog on knitwear for kittens.  But it’s the overlap of passion and profit that Ferriss stressed so much.
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