The Passive Income Portfolio takes you on an across-the-board journey, spanning multiple industries, toward generating and sustaining passive income. This cogently written piece of work takes you to the heart of creating Passive Income and does it brilliantly with its tiered approach that builds-up the process of generating residual income streams in a structured lucid style. The author dexterously juggles targeted income generating strategies with acute business and financial insights and real life illustrations in a compelling and easy to read format. The subject is covered with ample breadth and compelling profundity using a step-by-step approach. As you roll through the pages and bask in the insights, you will not only witness a change in your mindset but also come across direct go-to resources that you can use to begin implementing the theories mentioned herein. A complete reference book, this is a must read for all the passive income aficionados who want to bite into real substance. http://www.thepassiveincomeportfolio.com/


I always knew it would take hard graft and a lot of time. I started writing three years ago, at that time, for no other reason than I wanted to put pen to paper. However, over the years my blog has developed into something I would like to focus more on and would like to monetise it. So can I ask, are there any good books or other websites etc I should be reading to help with SEO etc – I understand the basics but I now want to know more.
Keep in mind that most passive income business ideas usually become largely profitable after a certain amount of time, depending on the time and money you put in. It is important to know that some, also, never make it and fail - just like any other business in the world. However, some passive income businesses are more vulnerable and others are less risky and more prone to giving a good payout at the end of the month.
"The majority of people I see who are interested in passive income and pursuing it, haven't learned how to create value in the first place. They're just trying to do gimmicks and tricks and formulas. They're trying to do the automation part, but they've missed the point that the automation only spits off cash if it's based first on automating something that actually creates value. If you automate something that is worthless---or worse than worthless, a scam -- it's not going to work in the long run."
Not exactly, even though that’s what passive income pushers would have you believe. No, once your site goes live, you need to perform various marketing tasks like promoting your posts and interacting with people on social media, commenting on other blogs, and seeking out new promotional opportunities. Oh and any good blog out there isn’t just preloaded with content and left to stagnate. No, you actually have to write new posts, too. And even if you hire someone to write the post for you, it’s you who has to edit them, schedule them, and oversea the whole operation. All of these things are not passive at all.

Obviously, if you’re starting from scratch and you haven’t written your book quite yet, you should think about subjects that are of interest to you. If you write about topics that you lack a passion for, you’re embedding your own boredom into your poorly-prostituted words, and no-one’s gonna go for that; regardless of how punchy you make your title.
This lesson of repackaging, proved transformational for my second information product all those years ago.  I took a treasure trove of writing and turned it into several multimedia forms, including audio and video.  I was then able to sell the course as a multimedia driven training program.  It allowed me to charge 4 times the price (of an already expensive ebook), and dramatically boost conversions.
Insurance agents, authors, credit card processing professionals, multilevel marketing participants and actors are good examples of people who often receive monthly, quarterly, semiannual or annual residual income. For example, your job is to sell credit card processing services to retail merchants. A merchant signs a card-processing contract with your company. First, you will receive active income for making the sale. Every month thereafter, as long as the merchant stays with your company, you receive monthly residual payments based on the merchant's credit card sales volume. The more merchants you have, the higher your monthly residual income.
Many people talk about passive income and create the impression that you never have to do anything to keep that income going. The truth is that you will normally have to keep your eye on things if you want it to run smoothly. For example Richard Branson doesn’t run any of the 400+ companies he started but he goes over the numbers each day to make sure they’re performing well and calls the CEO if there are any problems.
An interesting story going back to my LEED book — when I sold that book the first month, about 20%-25% of the customers were people who had already passed the exam. They emailed me and said Pat, I wanted to buy this book from you because I needed a way to pay you back for all the information you shared for free with me to help me pass the exam before.
People consider me an expert now, but I still have to get up and keep going in order to succeed and to provide value. You don’t actually have to be an expert, you just have to know more than the people who are looking for that information.  That was the case with Green Exam Academy. I wasn’t a person who got a perfect score on the exam, yet I was seen as an expert because I was the one talking about it online and I had done the test myself and passed it.
Personality -- Personality's great if your intention is to build a community around your blog. But newsflash: that's not the "right" way to blog (nothing is), nor is it the only option. My small business blog went from $0 - $2000 per month in just a few months, and it was pretty much devoid of personality. There aren't many comments there. I've never made an effort to change that. The posts are simple new and how-to posts. They're not opinions in most cases. There aren't many reviews. I never blogged there to build conversations. I blogged there to earn from my writing. And I have. On the other hand, my PR blog also monetizes rather well. That blog completely revolves around my no-bullshit personality when confronting PR and social media issues. On the other hand, AFW has personality injected, but is also more instructional than NakedPR is -- it falls somewhere in the middle. No method has really proved better than the others overall. It's all about knowing what the niche audience really wants (community vs news vs instructional content or some mix). Sometimes you'll guess wrong.
Most of the stuff I see sold on the report is not stuff I’ve recommended. What this has taught me is that you want people to click on an Amazon link because you have a high chance that they will buy something within the next 24 hours that will get credited to you. So your goal is for people to click on your links and not necessarily to buy what you’re recommending.
If you don’t have a mailing list, then build your list pre-launch. Create a way to capture email addresses on your site and social media accounts and promise that anyone signed up to the mailing list gets first dibs on the book or perhaps a special deal. It’s also important to collect email addresses, so that you can promote future books to existing readers.
Creating a product to sell is decidedly active, not passive. And selling other people’s products is active too when you have to build your own store and maintain inventory. However, if you use dropshipping, all you have to do is set up a store and drive was web traffic to it. Everything else is handled by another company and you walk away with a share of the profits.

About Blog The College Investor helps millennials get out of student loan debt to start investing, building passive income, and wealth for the future. Today, it's the go to resource for millennials looking for information about how to get out of student loan debt and start investing in their future. Follow this blog to get tips on Millennial Personal Finance and Investing.
You can publish a book in two forms: paperback and e-book. E-books are much easier to get published, and they’re wildly popular these days. They’re also convenient for the reader. After writing an e-book, all you have to do is set up an account on a seller, like Amazon or Nookpress, and start promoting your book! Here is a simple guide on getting your e-book published. As I mentioned before, if you already have an audience, such as on a website, that’s the best place to promote your e-book. This article will also explain how to set up a website.
The right niche -- If no one is searching for information in a niche, you won't get traffic, and you won't be able to convert that traffic into blogging income. That said, you could take a traditionally low-income or low-interest niche and twist it into something more attractive to readers, such as by combining two niches, broadening it, or even narrowing it.

Shane and Jocelyn Sams, who were teachers before. Shane listened to my podcast, and he was like, check out this guy Pat, and his wife was like, No, that sounds kind of scammy to me. But then they decided to give creating digital products a try, so Jocelyn created a website called Elementary Librarian where she was selling packages and worksheets to librarians to help them and that site is doing really well. And Shane is a football coach, so he created coachxo.com to sell defensive plays to coaches. Both of those are doing well over six figures a month now, and they’re doing it through pdf files, worksheets and tools that their audience can use to help them in a more convenient way.
PPS oh you thought I was done did you?!  The other parts of the book, although not truly passive income generation focused, are amazing too.  I know things like the low information diet and killing interruptions have made a huge difference to my success – and if I can try and get a little more consistency in my adherence to them, then happy freaking days!
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