Once people find success, what commonly happens is they don’t believe that they deserve it or they believe it was accidental, and that’s crept into my head a few times. It’s a very debilitating thing. You start to doubt and you stop working and you stop believing in yourself and you stop putting as much effort in. But I also have a great group of friends who help me with those feelings, and just realizing how many people’s lives I’ve touched and all the notes I get help. That’s why I have that large 5’x5’ space on my wall with notes on it saying “Thanks, Pat,” “Thanks, Pat.” I have a folder in my inbox just for testimonials of what I’ve done — it helps me remember that I’m actually making a difference, and it’s not accidental, this success.
I spent about $45 on Facebook Ads targeting clicks to my book on Amazon. I paid around $0.30 CPC, and 155 clicks in total, but I couldn’t track how many sales were from Facebook, and I didn’t see ROI because I estimated 3–5 ad-driven book sales, which is at best $9 per additional sale. The other issue is that Amazon doesn’t tell you anything about who’s viewing your page or referral sources, so it’s hard to close the loop.
But, you don't need to go further than that. You can simply write it and publish it and collect the income. That's all. Send out a couple emails to your list (if you have one) or post it on social media, and there you have it. Passive income. Now, the amount of income you receive depends on the quality of the book you've written. How well did you craft the message? How targeted was the information to your audience? It counts.
Blogging is truly the best job in the world and I am so glad I started mine all those years ago! I am not gonna sit here and tell you that it’s EASY to create a profitable six figure blog, but I am fairly confident in saying that it’s quite common to create a blog that makes $1,000 to $2,000 per month on autopilot with a year or two of consistent daily effort.

If your research really does determine that there is some amazing market niche that until now has miraculously gone unnoticed and unserved---dog owners who wish to help their dogs lose weight naturally, for example---sooner or later, word is going to get out that there's money to be made there, and someone is going to create a better ebook or info course or product that serves that market's needs better than yours does, and who markets it better to them than you do. You can't manage this competition while sipping margaritas all day from your paradise restaurant on Fiji. You'll soon see your market share go down the drain---just like all those Açai cleanses. . .


Sorry I don’t think blogging is passive income. Truly passive income comes in rain or shine – pensions, annuities, dividends, SS. In some cases, even when you are 6 feet under (for your beneficiaries). I would even venture to call it “permanent income” (as long as someone is around to collect). As someone else stated, even rental income is not truly passive since there is a fair amount of work going into keeping renters, maintenance, administrative/financial accounting, etc.
Once again, though, it’s like starting any company. While you might not necessarily need to know how to code, you do need an entrepreneurial mindset, work ethic, and personality type, and you’ll probably struggle for years, going through a string of failures before you finally get it right. If you’re successful, though, the passive income potential is enormous.
One of the primary benefits of residual income is that it takes little continued effort to maintain. Passive income includes things like royalties received for creating an intellectual property such as a book, advertisement payments received for Internet traffic on websites or content you create, dividends paid on stocks you hold and rent payments. Creating residual income often takes a considerable amount of initial effort, such as writing a book or article, creating a website, buying a building and renting it out or researching and purchasing dividend-paying stocks, but after the initial effort, you receive income over time with little or no additional effort. This can allow you to pursue other opportunities while continuing to earn income based on past efforts.
There is a specific tax definition of passive income, known as “passive activity” to the Internal Revenue Service. Passive income is any income you make without actively working or are materially involved. The IRS defines it as any rental activity or any business in which the taxpayer does not “materially participate.” Nonpassive activities, or active activities, are businesses in which the taxpayer works on a regular, continuous, and substantial basis.
This lesson of repackaging, proved transformational for my second information product all those years ago.  I took a treasure trove of writing and turned it into several multimedia forms, including audio and video.  I was then able to sell the course as a multimedia driven training program.  It allowed me to charge 4 times the price (of an already expensive ebook), and dramatically boost conversions.
ABC International has invested $1 million in the assets assigned to its Idaho subsidiary. As an investment center, the facility is judged based on its return on invested funds. The subsidiary must meet an annual return on investment target of 12%. In its most recent accounting period, Idaho has generated net income of $180,000. The return can be measured in two ways:
ABC International has invested $1 million in the assets assigned to its Idaho subsidiary. As an investment center, the facility is judged based on its return on invested funds. The subsidiary must meet an annual return on investment target of 12%. In its most recent accounting period, Idaho has generated net income of $180,000. The return can be measured in two ways:

The last plugin I’m going to talk about here today is Sensei from WooThemes. This plugin offers another way to create courses, take on new students, and offer assessments within the WordPress dashboard. Though you can use it as a full LMS, it’s also useful for setting up a course and then walking away. Automatic assessments make it totally possible to accomplish this.


Jitendra Vaswani is the founder of SchemaNinja WordPress Plugin, prior to SchemaNinja he is the founder of big internet marketing blog BloggersIdeas.com. He is successful online marketer & award winning digital marketing consultant. He has been featured on HuffingtonPost, BusinessWorld, YourStory, Payoneer, Lifehacker & other leading publication as a successful blogger & digital marketer. Jitendra Vaswani is also a frequent speaker & having 5+ yrs experience of in Digital Marketing field. Check out his portfolio( jitendra.co). Find him on Google+, Twitter, & Facebook.
Being a successful blogger is a lot harder than it looks. Being able to consistently generate enough quality content to earn a loyal and enthusiastic audience separates the men from the boys and Jitendra is clearly one of the up and coming young men in the global blogosphere. He has the passion and tireless drive it takes to cover all of the bases and continually deliver fresh, valuable information that helps his readers make money and keep coming back for more
There are so many great resources today at our fingertips to learn about the world of investing, business, and finance such as blogs, podcasts, and online courses. However, I feel the most tried and true method is still by reading good ol’ fashioned books. I’ve collectively spent a few hundred dollars to purchase these books, but I can tell you that they have resulted in countless dollars in savings and millions in current and future earnings. There really is no better return on investment.
If you read everything I said here and your response is, “Okay, that’s fair. I can give it four years,” then you’re already way ahead of most people. On the other hand, you might also say, “Jon, this is interesting, but I really don’t have that kind of time, so I’m going to bow out now.” In that case, congratulations, you just saved yourself a lot of wasted time.
Great post and comments. All your points in the article are spot on. My vote is Definitely NOT passive income. Launched my blog about 1 year ago without a lot of clear direction. After working with a productivity coach, we narrowed the focus (somewhat) and got rolling with more regular posts in March/April 2017. Small budget outsourcing on Graphics and SEO moved the needle a bit further. Google Adwords campaign a bit further. I just spent about 5 hours re-working a guest blog post for a food site, after already putting in at least 5 hours on the original version. Especially in the early years, there is NOTHING passive about sweat equity. Reducing the learning curve really does add real skills though, so you can hit the ground running and efficiently manage your time. Was interesting to see the vote tallies, thanks for the post.
And speaking of not selling to everyone, don’t try to create products that are trying to speak to everyone. Don’t be afraid to get specific. For example, I’m no longer buying “how to make money blogging” courses that are meant to include beginners. Why? Because I can count on 75% of the content, if not more, to be about things I’ve already done – buying a domain, setting up hosting, setting up this, that and the other thing. I’m spending money on things specifically created for people at my stage of the game. And guess what? That creates a lot of opportunity for you in creating additional courses! You can create one for the beginner, intermediate and advanced user. That's a lot of income potential.
As for Mr. Tako’s idea of hiring writers above, it’s not bad. However, in my experience it isn’t great either. Managing writers can be as much work as managing the other aspects of the blog. They come and go and I found myself spending more of my time on tasks that I didn’t enjoy (hiring and interviewing). I also felt like I didn’t have the same connection with my readers.
 One of the great things about selling on Amazon, as opposed to eBay is that your listing on Amazon is easier to find. If you’re listing a product that’s already being sold by another seller, your entry is organized by condition and price. If you’re offering the lowest-priced listing (and you have a decent seller rating), your listing will automatically appear in the Buy Box.
Hey, readers. I need your help today. Please vote on the poll at the end of this post. My question is this – should I consider blogging income as passive income? In 2017, we are very close to being able to cover 100% of our expenses with our passive income, but we’re not quite there yet. I don’t count blogging income as passive income at the moment. If I count blogging income, then we’re there. I’d like your opinion on how I should count blogging income. Blogging isn’t really passive, but the income is. It’s somewhat difficult to categorize.
Tied into this point, I like how Scott discourages big dreaming from the point of view that when you try to solve too big a problem, you’ll normally fail since you don’t have the resources to tackle it – eg don’t reinvent say ecommerce platforms with complex software, instead create an online video-driven course on how to build online stores using WordPress (as an example!).
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