About Blog Hi, I’m the Passive Income Earner. I also go by other names, such as Canadian Dividend Growth Investor. I’m based in Canada and I’m on a journey to build a passive income with dividends. In this blog, I share my experience in personal finance and investing, including mistakes I made and lessons learned. Occasionally, I will also write about financial and investing concepts I learn. Follow this blog to know about my journey on passive income through dividends.

In addition to the obvious — increasing your monthly income — many people develop specific investment plans for their monthly residuals. Popular strategies include allocating monthly residuals to a retirement account, a down payment on a home, education expenses and an emergency fund. Your strategy should include establishing a reserve for income taxes if you receive residuals in full, without withheld taxes. This prevents unwelcome surprises at tax time.


There are many ways to earn an income both online and offline. The main goal for most people is to earn a large enough income so they can accomplish and live the life that they choose on their terms. The unfortunate fact is, most people don't have the ability to live their lives on their own terms. They are a slave to their debts and they cannot break the cycle of living pay check to pay check.
Bloggers undervalue their offerings so often. It’s tragic in some cases. As someone that buys a lot of digital products, I urge you to price your offering higher than you think it’s worth. Why? Because I can’t tell you how often I buy $7 eBooks, give them a 15-minute scan and never implement a thing. $7 isn’t a big commitment to me. When we get into the $49-range on the other hand, I’m putting that puppy to work. I’ve got to make that money back. I immediately see your product as being of higher value before I even open the file.
Financing -- Sure, it's great if you have money to invest in a custom blog theme, advertising, or to hire other bloggers to help out in the beginning, but it's certainly not necessary. In fact, my highest-earning blogs were all started without spending a dime over the domain name and hosting (and since several are hosted together, that saved on the startup costs after the first). You can afford $10 or so per year. If you can't, you probably need to re-think your entire freelance career before you start planning new residual income streams.
Residual income is the amount of net income generated in excess of the minimum rate of return. Residual income concepts have been used in a number of contexts, including as a measurement of internal corporate performance whereby a company's management team evaluates the return generated relative to the company's minimum required return. Alternatively, in personal finance, residual income is the level of income that an individual has after the deduction of all personal debts and expenses have been paid.
You can publish a book in two forms: paperback and e-book. E-books are much easier to get published, and they’re wildly popular these days. They’re also convenient for the reader. After writing an e-book, all you have to do is set up an account on a seller, like Amazon or Nookpress, and start promoting your book! Here is a simple guide on getting your e-book published. As I mentioned before, if you already have an audience, such as on a website, that’s the best place to promote your e-book. This article will also explain how to set up a website.
Needless to say, you have to find a way to differentiate yourself from everyone else, but if you can, the income can be relatively passive. Chances are, you’ll still have to deal with some questions and complaints from customers about other people’s products, which I’m guessing can be quite a headache, but you don’t have to deal with manufacturing, warehousing, shipping, or any of the other headaches of creating the product yourself.
This startup work is something that anyone involved in establishing passive income will admit requires some serious elbow grease. It’s the great exception to the whole notion of “passive” income in that it’s decidedly not passive. And for the most part, this is acceptable. People seem to get on board with this idea. “Hey, if I just buckle down and do a bunch of work right now, I’ll be able to sit back and enjoy the fruits of my labor later.” It’s a simple enough concept.
Once people find success, what commonly happens is they don’t believe that they deserve it or they believe it was accidental, and that’s crept into my head a few times. It’s a very debilitating thing. You start to doubt and you stop working and you stop believing in yourself and you stop putting as much effort in. But I also have a great group of friends who help me with those feelings, and just realizing how many people’s lives I’ve touched and all the notes I get help. That’s why I have that large 5’x5’ space on my wall with notes on it saying “Thanks, Pat,” “Thanks, Pat.” I have a folder in my inbox just for testimonials of what I’ve done — it helps me remember that I’m actually making a difference, and it’s not accidental, this success.

The appeal of these passive income sources is that you can diversify across many small investments, rather than in a handful of large ones. When you invest directly in real estate, you have to commit a lot of capital to individual projects. When you invest in these crowdfunded investments, you can spread your money across many uncorrelated real estate ventures so individual investments don't cause significant issues.
I read from the publishing blogs that having a great cover and a great book summary on Amazon was critical. So I worked with Matt Chase, who is an amazingly talented artist/designer, to have the cover designed. People love the cover and I think it’s a huge differentiator for my book. You can reach out to him at http://chasematt.com/ if you’re interested in working with him.
For some reason, many writers I talk to are afraid of starting their own niche blog. They're afraid it will take up too much of their time. They're afraid they won't see a decent return on the effort put in. They're afraid no one will want to read what they have to say. And sometimes they're just afraid to start something new because they're not sure where to start. To those writers, I have one thing to say -- Get over it.
For some reason, many writers I talk to are afraid of starting their own niche blog. They're afraid it will take up too much of their time. They're afraid they won't see a decent return on the effort put in. They're afraid no one will want to read what they have to say. And sometimes they're just afraid to start something new because they're not sure where to start. To those writers, I have one thing to say -- Get over it.
While I don’t have any direct experience with it, I know it can be quite profitable, especially in niches where you have high profit margins and low shipping costs. Vitamins and cosmetics, for example, are two popular drop shipping industries. Anyone can theoretically start a “store” and have dozens or even hundreds of products to offer within a matter of days.
I’m feeling inspired! I’ve been a PT for 19 years and I feel I have so much experience to offer but have been so intimated by starting a blog. I also subscribed to Michelle’s website but wasn’t sure it was for real. Is it for real? After reading this I feel like it’s time to take the plunge, I need to start a blog, I have so many ideas and even course ideas. I want to get away from the paperwork that plagues our healthcare system but not leave the field so the blog just might be the answer. I’ve been a landlord for 15 years now, great investment for sure, renters paid for the down payment of our house and should hopefully help pay for our kids college. I’d love to have one more! Thank you for the inspiration, wish me luck with my blogging!
For example, if you were a trusted private wealth advisor or stockbroker, then I’d even argue this is the best way to earn passive income from your knowledge, since it’s recurring revenue and suits your target market, who want constantly up-to-date information.  PS I admit this is becoming a lot less passive given the ongoing report writing you would be doing.
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