stREITwise offers a hybrid investment between traditional REIT fund investing and the new crowdfunding. The fund is like a real estate investment trust in that it holds a collection of properties but more like crowdfunding in its management. The fund has paid a 10% annualized return since inception and is a great way to diversify your real estate exposure.
Eventually, I’ll have to stop blogging altogether. Don’t worry, it won’t be anytime soon. I still enjoy blogging, but I just don’t see myself blogging when I’m 70. That’s 27 years away so we have plenty of time left. I really don’t know what will happen to our traffic if I stop blogging completely and just repost old articles. I suspect the traffic will slowly drop and stabilize at some point. If you have firsthand experience, I’d love to hear about it. My optimistic guess is that traffic will eventually drop to 50% of the current level.
You can publish a book in two forms: paperback and e-book. E-books are much easier to get published, and they’re wildly popular these days. They’re also convenient for the reader. After writing an e-book, all you have to do is set up an account on a seller, like Amazon or Nookpress, and start promoting your book! Here is a simple guide on getting your e-book published. As I mentioned before, if you already have an audience, such as on a website, that’s the best place to promote your e-book. This article will also explain how to set up a website.
The Millionaire Fastlane – The author challenges the notion that the ideal life is to get a job, save slowly, retire old, and then have enough money to last the rest of your lifetime. He states that true wealth is having freedom, friends and family, and good health. His teaching has obviously rubbed off on me quite a bit. He challenges you to no longer be a consumer, but to think like a producer. Create and produce, become an entrepreneur, and that will put you on the fast lane to true wealth.
This book is a definite must read, and in the top 5 out of this list.  My favorite use for this book is to help people decide what business model to pursue – for a start anyway.  ie info product v membership site v affiliate marketing.  Since Joel compares them all and shows you the major challenges for each (along with how-to guides), the task becomes a lot easier.

I have posted a few times about the idea of passive income. Real estate investing is a much applauded form of ‘passive income’ in the modern sense. If you own properties, and rent them out, you will get rent checks coming in month after month, right? Right, but you still have to go out and locate the tenants, take care of utility issues and upgrades, etc. The idea of passive income is not that you have to completely do NO work, but the idea that when you set up a certain system, most of the day-to-day tasks are on auto-pilot. If you post everyday for 3 years straight, you will still get traffic in from the search engines, Yaro. As long as the ads are still on your site you will receive the passive income. This is your ‘system’. The idea of passive income is that so which you have the freedom to do something when you want to do it and you don’t have to give up working hours to go do that thing AND the money will still keep coming in. This can only happen if you set up your system.
Lenders may be willing to remove family members from the residual calculations if a non-purchasing spouse or a working-age child has sufficient income to cover their monthly debts. This can include children who receive Social Security or disability income, child support and other forms of income, provided it’s likely to continue for at least three years.

Of course, you can make honst money in Internet info-products, or affiliate marketing, or other such areas where people tend to get drawn to "passive income" fantasies. But, to make real money over the sustainable long-haul, you must treat these like any other business. In other words, you must provide real value to real customers with a real need.

Not exactly, even though that’s what passive income pushers would have you believe. No, once your site goes live, you need to perform various marketing tasks like promoting your posts and interacting with people on social media, commenting on other blogs, and seeking out new promotional opportunities. Oh and any good blog out there isn’t just preloaded with content and left to stagnate. No, you actually have to write new posts, too. And even if you hire someone to write the post for you, it’s you who has to edit them, schedule them, and oversea the whole operation. All of these things are not passive at all.
Typically, the above formula will be applied such that the company is assumed to achieve maturity, or "constant growth". (Note that the value will remain identical: the adjustment is a "telescoping" device). Here, analysts commonly employ the Perpetuity Growth Model to calculate the corresponding terminal value[3] (although various, more formal approaches are also applied[4]). Then, assuming long-run, "constant", growth {\displaystyle g} from year {\displaystyle m} , the terminal value is
Tied into this point, I like how Scott discourages big dreaming from the point of view that when you try to solve too big a problem, you’ll normally fail since you don’t have the resources to tackle it – eg don’t reinvent say ecommerce platforms with complex software, instead create an online video-driven course on how to build online stores using WordPress (as an example!).
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