I thought I was done, but my sales went up actually, because I think people saw there were guides there and looked to see what else was there, and I was able to price lower because I’m just Pat and they’re a company with overhead. So my guide, which was $29.99 at that time, was outselling their other guide because their guide was in the $100 range, and I think people resonated with me and my story: Hey, I’m Pat, I’m just like you. I created the guide that I wished was available when I took the exam.

Blogging has a very steep learning curve, but if you jump in head first and take it one step at a time (I recommend tackling only one confusing thing per day) and do one new thing each day to work on your blog, you will eventually get to a place where none of it seems confusing! (If you try to tackle too many new things at once, you WILL get discouraged! I urge you not to do this.)


Again, no leader worth her salt will be attracted to such an opportunity. And anyone you do hire to lead the value creation, if they have two brain cells, will see that she's the one adding all the value. Sooner or later she will simply find a way to cut you out of the value chain, either by requiring more and more compensation, or by going off and competing against you (and actively at that.) Why does she need you? You're not adding any value anyway!


Fox’s book is a little outdated now, but the alternative passive income streams he mentions includes straight up blogging (with the advertising and affiliate marketing as the natural monetization strategy), but also podcasting (don’t agree with this so much as a direct revenue stream) and vlogging (video blogging / web TV, whatever you want to call it).
Not passive. I suppose blogs have a “long tail” like any copyrighted work of art (book or song or whatever), but I don’t think it’s as easy to keep it monetized. That would be an argument for condensing and reformatting your blog posts to an updated, organized print or e-book. I think your traffic estimate is too generous, if you stopped producing current content.
Managing your own blog isn't as difficult as some people initially think. There's this misconception that you can't earn much money with your own blog, so you'd be better off going with content mills instead. Wrong! It's not difficult at all if you're willing to work for it. The only real excuse for choosing content mills over writing for yourself is that you don't want to be bothered with the work -- you just want to write. And frankly, that's lazy (and you know how I feel about lazy freelancers). If you're a hobby writer and you just want to write to get paid a few bucks, fine. Good for you. But don't call yourself a true freelance writer if you're not willing to work on the business end of your freelance career.

I launched that in October of 2008, and that very first month I sold that book for $19.99. I sold it in a way where people could come to the site, purchase it and, immediately after, the book, which was simply a pdf file I had written, was directly digitally delivered through an email to them. And as a result of that payment, it was just money into my Paypal account. That first month, I made $7,008.55. That was just life-changing for me.
The only way to increase your income substantially, then, is to reach more people. The difference, put simply, is between writing an article and a book. If you write an article and sell it to the New York Times for $1 a word, you’ll never see more money from that piece again. On the other hand, if you were to create a collection of articles and sell it in a book, you may (depending on various factors, which we’ll get to) see money from this book over and over again until you keep it in circulation.
Real estate is the obvious choice if you are going to make money on your money. I personally am not at the point where I can do any of this in a meaningful way BUT my parents are and they now own a couple homes outright and are collecting income from them to power their retirement income. It makes a lot more sense for anyone that has a chunk of cash sitting in the bank and are planning on slowly drawing from it because you technically still have all that money in a property (or multiple properties) and can sell them if you really need the lump sum of cash but you’ll earn great interest payments until you do that.
But what if ABC evaluates its prospective investments based on the return on investment percentage instead? In this case, the Idaho investment center is currently generating a return on investment of 18%, so making a new investment that will generate a 16% return will reduce the facility's overall return on investment to 17.8% ($196,000 total profit / $1.1 million total investment) - which might be grounds for rejecting the proposed investment.

The second big takeaway for me, was to pick a niche you know, you find interesting AND where there is demand for your product – ie willingness to buy/pay.  A lot of people only remember the first part of this 2-part formula, and end up creating a blog on knitwear for kittens.  But it’s the overlap of passion and profit that Ferriss stressed so much.
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