In addition to the obvious — increasing your monthly income — many people develop specific investment plans for their monthly residuals. Popular strategies include allocating monthly residuals to a retirement account, a down payment on a home, education expenses and an emergency fund. Your strategy should include establishing a reserve for income taxes if you receive residuals in full, without withheld taxes. This prevents unwelcome surprises at tax time.
What if the manager of the Idaho investment center wants to invest $100,000 in new equipment that will generate a return of $16,000 per year? This would provide residual income of $4,000, which is the amount by which it exceeds the minimum 12% rate of return threshold. This would be acceptable to management, since the focus is on generating an incremental amount of cash.
The ABCs of Real Estate Investing – It’s a great overview of real estate investing particularly in multifamily properties. It covers topics on how to perform due diligence, negotiate a deal, and manage properties. It really focuses on the fundamentals – the basic calculations needed to be a successful investor. It’s quite direct and easy to understand.
About Blog Hi, I’m the Passive Income Earner. I also go by other names, such as Canadian Dividend Growth Investor. I’m based in Canada and I’m on a journey to build a passive income with dividends. In this blog, I share my experience in personal finance and investing, including mistakes I made and lessons learned. Occasionally, I will also write about financial and investing concepts I learn. Follow this blog to know about my journey on passive income through dividends.
In equity valuation, residual income represents an economic earnings stream and valuation method for estimating the intrinsic value of a company's common stock. The residual income valuation model values a company as the sum of book value and the present value of expected future residual income. Residual income attempts to measure economic profit, which is the profit remaining after the deduction of opportunity costs for all sources of capital.
About Blog A Canadian blog. Tracking our progress on dividends and other passive income. I’m a 34yr old male loving life, happily married to my better half. We have a mini me and a dog living in Ontario Canada. We have been buying dividend stocks for just over a year now and placing them into our tfsa. Follow this blog to track our progress on dividends and other passive income.

Buy side Control premium Demerger Divestment Drag-along right Management due diligence Managerial entrenchment Minority discount Pitch book Pre-emption right Proxy fight Post-merger integration Sell side Shareholder rights plan Special-purpose entity Special situation Squeeze-out Staggered board of directors Stock swap Super-majority amendment Tag-along right Takeover Reverse Tender offer

As always, I’m here to answer questions (within my ability) and I can always help you find that YouTube tutorial you need. When you are REALLY ready to start taking your blog seriously, I have many resources available on my learning site, Adventures in Blogging. The Income & Traffic Bundle is a great place to start if you’re dying to learn everything you can about traffic & income.


If you are good at Mobile app development, or perhaps you are an experienced welder, you can create educational videos and articles, and even teach a whole class by signing up to websites that offer such services. Making an online course is no easy task, however quality content and a little effort can make your course several hundred dollars worth, so it might be a good idea to consider.
One word of advice, and something I intend to do once I have the money saved up, is to build or buy out property that can support apartments or townhomes. One tough mistake some people make is buying a pair of homes to rent out and they get a nice $2,000-$3,000 a month but that’s it. Buying a house is expensive and the rental prices keep lower income families from potentially coming to you with their money to rent. If you have an acre to work with (more or less is OK too) you should be talking to a contractor to build apartments or townhomes. You will make a little less per unit BUT your audience grows significantly because now you can have college students, single parents, older folks, etc. all able to afford your rental units AND instead of capturing one $1,000-$1,500 a month payments, you can probably charge $700 a month per unit (or more, depending on the market) and build maybe 3, 4, 5, 10 units for the price of a home or two and now you’re making something like $2,100-$10,000 a month. It all depends on what you have to invest but if you’ve got $250,000+ I’d highly suggest you talk to a bank/investor that can get you in touch with a good contractor to build on a property and get permits and take out a matching $250,000 loan (I’ve read that $500,000 is plenty to build a good amount of apartments to start) and you can fill up your apartments and make a killing every month. You’ll have more tenants to deal with but if you’re competitive with your pricing you won’t have a hard time keeping tenants or replacing them.
I'm going to be choosing a niche and domain name this week and launching a new WordPress blog. The only money I'll spend will be for the domain name (I'll use existing hosting as you might do if you're already hosting your own professional site). No paid advertising. No paying for custom designs or coding. I'll be launching the blog in the same way many of you might -- spending as little as possible up front.
An analysis of the firm's position in its industry and the structure of the industry will be necessary to justify one of these assumptions. The third scenario is the most realistic if we assume that over time, industry competition reduces economic profits to the point at which firms begin to leave the industry and ROE stabilizes at a long-run normal level. The strength of the persistence factor will depend partly on the sustainability of the firm's competitive advantage and the structure of the industry. The more sustainable the competitive advantage and the better the industry prospects, the higher the persistence factor.
There are a couple of problems with direct investment in real estate though. It’s expensive to buy even a single property, a minimum of tens of thousands of dollars, and there’s no way most investors can build a portfolio of different property types and in different regions to protect from those risks when you have all your money in just one or two investments.

If you don’t have a mailing list, then build your list pre-launch. Create a way to capture email addresses on your site and social media accounts and promise that anyone signed up to the mailing list gets first dibs on the book or perhaps a special deal. It’s also important to collect email addresses, so that you can promote future books to existing readers.
Residual disability policies pay benefits according to the amount of income you have lost because of your disability. These policies pay benefits even if you can work part-time and are not totally disabled. The benefit is based on the percentage of income you earn working part-time in relation to what you used to earn when working full-time. Most companies require a loss of income of at least 20 percent compared to your pre-disability income in order to qualify for residual disability benefits.
Residual income is different from a salary, or linear income, which is paid out strictly based on the number of hours a person works. Someone who works on a salary is often said to work “paycheck to paycheck.” This is because he pays all of his bills with his first paycheck and then must wait until he gets paid again to have more money. Ideally, someone will work hard building up a business so that he can enjoy the residual income once his goals have been met. Then he can work on additional projects while still earning money from his business.
Investing in a business: Another good way to generate passive income is to invest in a business --even a small one -- in return for a percentage of the profits - just like Shark Tank, only smaller. Lending $10,000 to a local business that, for example, is working on a mobile app for Apple phones could lead to a passive income-generated share of the profits when that mobile app starts selling like hot cakes.
You can start a blog with a free theme technically…you do this through WordPress after you install it with one click on Bluehost. This is an important distinction…..the free themes aren’t available through Bluehost, but rather WordPress itself. So you will sign up for webhosting with Bluehost, install WordPress, then search within WordPress for free themes.
Then, at the end of three months from the date of the domain registration, I'll let you know how much the blog is currently earning. I'll share traffic stats (you'd be surprised how little traffic you really need in order to earn a decent start-up income). I'll share specific revenue stats (as much as I'll be allowed to based on the ad networks' policies). I'll tell you exactly what I did to get there. My goal is to show you that you can at least hit a three figure income in three months. Obviously I'm not aiming for $100 to just call it a day. I will do the best I can using as little as I can in a model that anyone can follow. Some general updates will be posted here just to let you know the project is still under way. I hope that teaching by example will help to alleviate some of the fears some freelance writers have about blogging for residual income. Will you be along for the ride?
If you have money to invest, but you’re not sure if you should, then consider this. What will you be doing with the money anyway? Unless you’re buying something, the money will either be in liquid form or you’ll deposit it in the bank. It will earn a fraction of the return it could earn through stocks. Investing in stocks is a better way to save and grow your income.
Not exactly, even though that’s what passive income pushers would have you believe. No, once your site goes live, you need to perform various marketing tasks like promoting your posts and interacting with people on social media, commenting on other blogs, and seeking out new promotional opportunities. Oh and any good blog out there isn’t just preloaded with content and left to stagnate. No, you actually have to write new posts, too. And even if you hire someone to write the post for you, it’s you who has to edit them, schedule them, and oversea the whole operation. All of these things are not passive at all.

I’m not saying it’s a bad life. If you can make it through the learning phase (which I’ll talk about at length later), it’s still a hell of a lot better than having a regular day job, but I don’t know anyone getting paid tons of money to do absolutely nothing. While it’s theoretically possible, I don’t think it’s a realistic objective for most people.

There are many ways to earn an income both online and offline. The main goal for most people is to earn a large enough income so they can accomplish and live the life that they choose on their terms. The unfortunate fact is, most people don't have the ability to live their lives on their own terms. They are a slave to their debts and they cannot break the cycle of living pay check to pay check.


Blogging income is no more passive income than a writer who writes books for a living. You might get money rolling in during times that you’re not working, from income generated from the work that you already did… but you have to work to make the money. Nobody pays you during the 20-30 hours per week spent writing/researching. The money comes after the work is published. It’s definitely not passive.


Most coupon websites start from bedrooms, and later turn into offices with employees.. I can tell that about Indian coupon websites at least… After initial 12-18 months of SEO and other branding activities, the affiliate commissions can easily be in thousands of dollars.. And if Google loves you and gives you 1-3 spots for a popular merchants, then even $10,000 easily..
So below is a list of my favorite books with a small description of each. I hope to have full-length reviews of each of these on my site soon. I also added a little section – a “to-read” list of books that have been highly recommended by others and I plan to read in the next few months. Feel free to add some suggestions down in the comments as well.
Free Email Courses – Wait a minute. Free? I thought we were getting paid. We are. We are! As an example, I have a free 7-days to Finding Work from Home series that people joining one of my newsletters can receive. Every day for a week they receive a new email telling them about a specific work-at-home opportunity. Sprinkled throughout that series are affiliate links to some of my favorite work-from-home resources. It took me just a couple days to put that series together and it goes out like clockwork to hundreds of new subscribers each day. And I earn a commission if a few of those people decide to click through and purchase my recommendations.
If you become disabled for an extended period of time, disability insurance can provide financial protection. Disability policies pay benefits in the event you're unable to work at all ("total disability") or can work only some of the time ("residual" or "partial disability"). It's important to consider the different types of policies and their costs, so that you'll be able to select the coverage that's right for you.

Once again, that extra income was amazing because we were then hit with another blow. At six months pregnant, we were told that our second son would come out with health problems. I took the time to research and prepare and after he was born, our life completely changed for about two months. He was very sick, in the NICU, and almost lost his life twice. A blood transfusion was what finally saved him. During those months I did nothing in the way of working my business. Yet I still got paid. I was able to take the time to be with my son in the NICU, care for my then toddler with special needs, and still make a monthly income that could help with groceries and bills.


Affiliate marketing spins around having readers click on the links in your articles and then subsequently purchasing the products you were writing about. Once they click the link in your article and then buy the product, you get a piece of the pie through commission. Commission varies among companies, but usually it is anywhere between 2% up to 10%.
I highly recommend the following Passive Income book. This book uncovers most of the latest, important and useful techniques that a professional earner uses in his projects. It is a good reference because it shows you the techniques exactly. It's not the book with full of theories rather an instructive tutorial which involves you with the real thing.
Great post and comments. All your points in the article are spot on. My vote is Definitely NOT passive income. Launched my blog about 1 year ago without a lot of clear direction. After working with a productivity coach, we narrowed the focus (somewhat) and got rolling with more regular posts in March/April 2017. Small budget outsourcing on Graphics and SEO moved the needle a bit further. Google Adwords campaign a bit further. I just spent about 5 hours re-working a guest blog post for a food site, after already putting in at least 5 hours on the original version. Especially in the early years, there is NOTHING passive about sweat equity. Reducing the learning curve really does add real skills though, so you can hit the ground running and efficiently manage your time. Was interesting to see the vote tallies, thanks for the post.
When you read Russell's new book. You will be amazed at how simple and effective his strategies are. It's like mining for gold nuggets and your striking it rich in any direction you swing! Every chapter gets you one step closer to burning bridge to your old marketing and sales ways. Expert Secrets sent me down a path in story telling and branding I didn't expect to pursue.
Great article, Joe! I’ve thought about this a lot…whether blogging is passive or not. By definition, it probably isn’t (since the income goes away if you stop), but it FEELS passive. “feels”. Ew. Feelings. Blegh. Anyhoo…even if it isn’t passive, I can’t stop doing it because I love it so much. So if you like writing and interaction with readers, it seems passive, but to anyone else, they’ll have to put in a lot of work for very little gain, so it seems VERY active.
Airbnb is a concept that has only been around for a few years, but it has exploded around the globe. Airbnb allows people to travel all around the world and to stay in accommodations that are a lot less expensive than traditional hotels. They do this by staying with participating Airbnb members who rent out part of their homes to travelers. By participating in Airbnb, you can use your residence to accommodate guests and earn extra money just for renting out space in your home.
About Blog The College Investor helps millennials get out of student loan debt to start investing, building passive income, and wealth for the future. Today, it's the go to resource for millennials looking for information about how to get out of student loan debt and start investing in their future. Follow this blog to get tips on Millennial Personal Finance and Investing.
Residual income is calculated as net income less a charge for the cost of capital. The charge is known as the equity charge and is calculated as the value of equity capital multiplied by the cost of equity or the required rate of return on equity. Given the opportunity cost of equity, a company can have positive net income but negative residual income.
There are places online that can help you find developers, such as websites offering freelancing services similar to Upwork. These developers are willing to haggle for the costs of development, and creating a simple mobile app that generates minimal amounts of money doesn’t have to be too expensive. I’ve seen examples of apps that do the simplest measurement conversions (kg to lbs) or apps that show you the nearest parking spot generate thousands of dollars in just a few months.

Great article, Joe! I’ve thought about this a lot…whether blogging is passive or not. By definition, it probably isn’t (since the income goes away if you stop), but it FEELS passive. “feels”. Ew. Feelings. Blegh. Anyhoo…even if it isn’t passive, I can’t stop doing it because I love it so much. So if you like writing and interaction with readers, it seems passive, but to anyone else, they’ll have to put in a lot of work for very little gain, so it seems VERY active.
In addition to the noted jobs, there are many others that include monthly residuals. Use this rule of thumb: Industries that offer products or services that involve "pay as you go" contracts or agreements often pay monthly residuals to sales employees. For example, alarm companies selling ongoing home or business monitoring for a monthly fee may offer residual income to those who sell this service. In some cases, jobs that involve referring prospects for services that continue month-to-month also pay residuals. Always verify that, regardless of the industry, a job you're considering does or does not pay monthly residuals. Never assume.
Sorry I don’t think blogging is passive income. Truly passive income comes in rain or shine – pensions, annuities, dividends, SS. In some cases, even when you are 6 feet under (for your beneficiaries). I would even venture to call it “permanent income” (as long as someone is around to collect). As someone else stated, even rental income is not truly passive since there is a fair amount of work going into keeping renters, maintenance, administrative/financial accounting, etc.
This sort of falls between creating a blog and an online course. The information can be presented on your site for free with affiliate links or through a subscription. How you earn income here will vary, of course, but the idea is the same as the other methods described above: Create something once and continue to collect income for months or years to come.
Blogging is truly the best job in the world and I am so glad I started mine all those years ago! I am not gonna sit here and tell you that it’s EASY to create a profitable six figure blog, but I am fairly confident in saying that it’s quite common to create a blog that makes $1,000 to $2,000 per month on autopilot with a year or two of consistent daily effort.
I’ve been writing about this since around 2006 or 2007 and I have a monthly article about “alternative income”, which is what I consider blogging. You could say it’s another term for “50% passive.” No one would confuse it with collecting dividends from a dividend ETF, but at the same time, you can take a week off and still earn a certain percentage or baseline of what you may earn if you wrote actively.
Within my first few months working I was able to bring in a good monthly income, which was great because shortly after starting my business, my eighteen-month-old son was diagnosed with autism. Obviously, my business took a back seat. I did not work regular hours for months as we were going through evaluations, lining up therapists, and emotionally dealing with what we just learned. I spent more hours doing therapy and research than working my business. Yet I still got paid. That is the benefit of residual income. I still got a check each month for work I had done my first few months in the business even though I was not working.
You know the fantasy: write some ebook (or better yet, hire freelancers in Mumbai to research and write it for you at $.20/word!) on some niche topic, set up AdWords and Facebook campaigns targeted to the right keywords (you can hire those Mumbai guys to do your keyword research too), put up a cheap landing page (with copy written by... guess who!), press "Go!" on the PPC campaign, and voilà. . . just wait for the money to roll in while you sleep!
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