Admittedly, there are 100s of books out there covering the exact same stuff, but what I like about this – and in a similar vein to Get Rich Click – it’s the comprehensive listing and side-by-side comparison of all the different techniques and tips that I freaking love.  Once again, I know all the stuff in this book pretty well now, but I still run over it frequently to jog my memory and use it to work out whether I’ve covered all my bases – kind of like a checklist in that sense.
Not passive. I suppose blogs have a “long tail” like any copyrighted work of art (book or song or whatever), but I don’t think it’s as easy to keep it monetized. That would be an argument for condensing and reformatting your blog posts to an updated, organized print or e-book. I think your traffic estimate is too generous, if you stopped producing current content.
Residual income is income that a person continues to make after the work he has put into a project has been completed. Residual income is different from linear income in that linear income refers to someone’s salary. Salaries are paid based on the number of hours someone works in the present, rather than the royalties someone can earn on work that was done in the past. To explore this concept, consider the following residual income definition.
The right niche -- If no one is searching for information in a niche, you won't get traffic, and you won't be able to convert that traffic into blogging income. That said, you could take a traditionally low-income or low-interest niche and twist it into something more attractive to readers, such as by combining two niches, broadening it, or even narrowing it.
For some reason, many writers I talk to are afraid of starting their own niche blog. They're afraid it will take up too much of their time. They're afraid they won't see a decent return on the effort put in. They're afraid no one will want to read what they have to say. And sometimes they're just afraid to start something new because they're not sure where to start. To those writers, I have one thing to say -- Get over it.
Almost all of these ideas require starting a personal blog or website. But the great thing about that is that it's incredibly cheap to do. We recommend using Bluehost to get started. You get a free domain name and hosting starts at just $2.95 per month - a deal that you won't find many other places online! You can afford that to start building a passive income stream.
In the blogging world it’s common to hear other bloggers talking about ways to make income. One of those ways is by using affiliate links. An affiliate link is a link with a tracking code; when a person clicks on that link and buys the product you get a commission on that purchase. Affiliate links are a great way to make passive income (see how much I make with affiliate income per month.)
Then, at the end of three months from the date of the domain registration, I'll let you know how much the blog is currently earning. I'll share traffic stats (you'd be surprised how little traffic you really need in order to earn a decent start-up income). I'll share specific revenue stats (as much as I'll be allowed to based on the ad networks' policies). I'll tell you exactly what I did to get there. My goal is to show you that you can at least hit a three figure income in three months. Obviously I'm not aiming for $100 to just call it a day. I will do the best I can using as little as I can in a model that anyone can follow. Some general updates will be posted here just to let you know the project is still under way. I hope that teaching by example will help to alleviate some of the fears some freelance writers have about blogging for residual income. Will you be along for the ride?
Our favorite platform for this is RealtyMogul because you get the flexibility to invest as little as $1,000, but can also participate in REITs and private placements – typically not offered to the public. Investors can fund real estate loans to gain passive income or buy an equity share in a property for potential appreciation. Their platform is open to both accredited and non-accredited investors.
An interesting story going back to my LEED book — when I sold that book the first month, about 20%-25% of the customers were people who had already passed the exam. They emailed me and said Pat, I wanted to buy this book from you because I needed a way to pay you back for all the information you shared for free with me to help me pass the exam before.
Within my first few months working I was able to bring in a good monthly income, which was great because shortly after starting my business, my eighteen-month-old son was diagnosed with autism. Obviously, my business took a back seat. I did not work regular hours for months as we were going through evaluations, lining up therapists, and emotionally dealing with what we just learned. I spent more hours doing therapy and research than working my business. Yet I still got paid. That is the benefit of residual income. I still got a check each month for work I had done my first few months in the business even though I was not working.

One word of advice, and something I intend to do once I have the money saved up, is to build or buy out property that can support apartments or townhomes. One tough mistake some people make is buying a pair of homes to rent out and they get a nice $2,000-$3,000 a month but that’s it. Buying a house is expensive and the rental prices keep lower income families from potentially coming to you with their money to rent. If you have an acre to work with (more or less is OK too) you should be talking to a contractor to build apartments or townhomes. You will make a little less per unit BUT your audience grows significantly because now you can have college students, single parents, older folks, etc. all able to afford your rental units AND instead of capturing one $1,000-$1,500 a month payments, you can probably charge $700 a month per unit (or more, depending on the market) and build maybe 3, 4, 5, 10 units for the price of a home or two and now you’re making something like $2,100-$10,000 a month. It all depends on what you have to invest but if you’ve got $250,000+ I’d highly suggest you talk to a bank/investor that can get you in touch with a good contractor to build on a property and get permits and take out a matching $250,000 loan (I’ve read that $500,000 is plenty to build a good amount of apartments to start) and you can fill up your apartments and make a killing every month. You’ll have more tenants to deal with but if you’re competitive with your pricing you won’t have a hard time keeping tenants or replacing them.
About Blog Simplify Learning For Earning. Passive Income Simplified is a website started by me, Kaizer Md Amin, to help you understand the basics of the financial markets so that you can become a smart investor instead of blindly following stock market tips and advice. You know that proven strategies exist which successful geniuses have used and still use repeatedly to generate passive.
Buy a small business: A local small business, like a car wash or a laundromat, is a great way to put money down on a money-making venture. Automate it so you don't have to be on the premises unless you're collecting money. Go into a local business with your eyes wide open - study the books, especially on income and expenses, and examine water and utility bills if your venture will be open 24 hours.
"Residual disability" is generally defined as the inability to perform one or more duties of your occupation, or the inability to perform these duties as often as before, coupled with the loss of a significant percentage of your pre-disability income. While "partial disability" is similar to residual disability, the ways in which benefits are calculated for these two types of coverage differ.
Many people talk about passive income and create the impression that you never have to do anything to keep that income going. The truth is that you will normally have to keep your eye on things if you want it to run smoothly. For example Richard Branson doesn’t run any of the 400+ companies he started but he goes over the numbers each day to make sure they’re performing well and calls the CEO if there are any problems.

Before you start working towards a passive income, you should have enough money saved up, that you can use for investments and costs. You’ll also need some money to fall back on. Residual income ideas sometimes don’t work, so you should keep spare money in case an idea doesn’t work out. You can eventually earn a passive income if you keep working hard at one or more ideas.

Residual income is income that a person continues to make after the work he has put into a project has been completed. Residual income is different from linear income in that linear income refers to someone’s salary. Salaries are paid based on the number of hours someone works in the present, rather than the royalties someone can earn on work that was done in the past. To explore this concept, consider the following residual income definition.


Bryan added: "If you make your choices based on, not 'how can I get money for free?' but on, 'What challenge can I put in front of my face that's going to have me step up to be the kind of person I'd rather be?' you're going to start to forget about wanting passive income, and you're going to start to focus on what purpose you truly want to create the world."
To create residual income, you need to create something that people will continue to buy on a regular basis long after you’ve created it. A house is a prime example of this as people will continue to pay rent for the right to live in the house. A business needs to have products that are sold over and over again rather than trading the business owner’s time for money.

I love being a blogger. One of the main reasons is that I have been able to stop exchanging time for money with the passive income from my blogs. There are only so many hours in the day. There is only so much you can earn per week in most traditional jobs. Not a fan. I want to maximize my efforts. I want to make money passively even when I'm on vacation or taking a little break.

About Blog Physician, Passive Income Enthusiast, Blogger dedicated to helping others achieve financial freedom through multiple income streams. This blog will serve as a personal documentation of my journey to find ways to achieve passive income, which will ultimately allow me to spend more time with loved ones. Follow this blog as I share my ideas on financial freedom through passive income.
Another option for managing ads on your site is called Ad Injection. This plugin allows you to insert any ad from any service like AdSense, Clickbank, Amazon Associates, and more into your site’s posts and pages with just a few clicks. You have a say over how many ads appear in your posts based on their length. You can even customize your ad’s viewers by customizing by visitor referrer, IP address, and the post’s age.
I would factor it in as a bridge gap. If you plan to keep doing it for 5 years, count it at 100% for those years. Then look at what the compound growth of your investments would be in 5 years, and calculate based on that number. I’m doing a beta version of a new course about mini-retirements right now with 25 people. And a lot of people are in your same boat, close to FI but not quite. So we work on different ways to organize the buckets of income to fill the gap for either a gap year, or semi-retirement. And create an array of backup options. 🙂
Most coupon websites start from bedrooms, and later turn into offices with employees.. I can tell that about Indian coupon websites at least… After initial 12-18 months of SEO and other branding activities, the affiliate commissions can easily be in thousands of dollars.. And if Google loves you and gives you 1-3 spots for a popular merchants, then even $10,000 easily..

Now that I have this money coming in, I’m able to explore new options with investing and buying a house a bit sooner in my career. I’m also very happy to be in a place now where I can give back, so I’ve been doing a lot of donating and helping other people get their start. I’m going to be building some schools in poor areas of the world through a company called Pencils of Promise. It’s a personal thing, but I’m also interested in having people come along with me as I document those experiences. My goal is to show people that it isn’t just about the material stuff but about giving: I try to build more to make more money to give more and be an example to other people in the world but also to my kids. When they’re 30 and talking about how their parents raised them, I want them to think we’ve set a good example. I want them to know that there’s joy in giving.

The topic of buying and selling blogs deserves it’s own book though and is a very difficult skill to master I must say.  I rant about the greatness and simultaneous pitfalls of marketplaces like Flippa elsewhere on this site, but needless to say I think this is it’s own expertise; worth learning more about for a lot of us who know that starting a business (getting momentum) is a lot tougher than fixing up and steering an existing business to greater profits (maintaining and directing momentum).

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