Investing in rental properties: Another form of real estate investment, rental investments (i.e. becoming a landlord) could steer you down the passive income path of steady monthly rent checks that you can use to pay off a mortgage loan on the rental property. After the mortgage is paid off, those monthly checks go right into your bank account -- potentially for years to come. 
Another option for managing ads on your site is called Ad Injection. This plugin allows you to insert any ad from any service like AdSense, Clickbank, Amazon Associates, and more into your site’s posts and pages with just a few clicks. You have a say over how many ads appear in your posts based on their length. You can even customize your ad’s viewers by customizing by visitor referrer, IP address, and the post’s age.
Self-hosting -- If your goal is to earn money through your blog, this is non-negotiable. Host it yourself (and yes, that means paying for a domain registration and hosting account). Personally I recommend GoDaddy for domains and HostGator for hosting. They're the combination I use for the majority of my blogs. Why is this important? Because if you want to effectively monetize your blog, you need complete control over monetization options and access to thorough site statistics. The easiest way to guarantee access to both is to host your blog yourself.
The underlying idea is that investors require a rate of return from their resources – i.e. equity – under the control of the firm's management, compensating them for their opportunity cost and accounting for the level of risk resulting. This rate of return is the cost of equity, and a formal equity cost must be subtracted from net income. Consequently, to create shareholder value, management must generate returns at least as great as this cost. Thus, although a company may report a profit on its income statement, it may actually be economically unprofitable; see Economic profit. It is thus possible that a value deemed positive using a traditional discounted cash flow (DCF) approach may be negative here. RI-based valuation is therefore a valuable complement to more traditional techniques.
After some long chats, I learned I need a schedule. So now I know when to work, and everyone else knows when it’s my time to work: It’s after the kids go to bed. Things will change everyone once in a while — if I have a big project coming up, for example, like during the recent launch of my podcast player, I was asking my wife, can you watch the kids longer?
Blogging is still going to take work starting out. That path to $5,000 a month didn’t happen overnight but just like real estate development, it build up an asset that now creates constant cash flow whether I work or not. I get over 30,000 visitors a month from Google search rankings, rankings that will continue to send traffic even if I take a little time off.
I wonder what the avg number of hours/week (over a year) would be for something to be considered “passive income”. To me, it’d be under an hour a week. If I was able to earn money from something with that time investment, the hour a week would be mostly a time investment in checking on things that it’s still working and setting the course back on track.
Needless to say, you have to find a way to differentiate yourself from everyone else, but if you can, the income can be relatively passive. Chances are, you’ll still have to deal with some questions and complaints from customers about other people’s products, which I’m guessing can be quite a headache, but you don’t have to deal with manufacturing, warehousing, shipping, or any of the other headaches of creating the product yourself.

Stock dividends: Some stocks, especially stocks from big corporate standouts, pay dividends to shareholders based on the number of shares they own, and the percentage of the stock price on the dividend date. For example, if a company pays out 3% on a stock that's trading at $100 per share, you'll earn $3 for every share of that stock you own. Add it up and that can be good take-home pay as a passive investment.
I would not have read this post now if I could’ve slept. I’m glad I read it though because I have heard how easy and fast you can make “passive” income and not have to work many times. I am not one to spend on a lot of programs but I am finally realizing how much work is involved in getting to a point where you only work a few hours a week and make a good living.

Then I learned about how people earn money without leaving their house, and even working from another country, and without having to spend too much time on it. This is where passive income comes into play. To be honest this hit me pretty hard the moment when I realized it - there are ways to earn money every month by doing almost nothing, and it’s not renting a house or apartment you inherited? First thing I thought when I heard this was “What can I do to make this happen, ASAP!?!”
I still don’t consider it an area of expertise. When I started Smart Passive Income, that was the month I launched my ebook for the architecture site. I didn’t consider myself an expert. It was just something no one had taught me about. People were talking about online business but not about how to automate the process, so I just wanted to create a platform to give it all away. I still don’t know everything about it, but through trial and error, I’ve learned about the process and recorded it.

The term “residual income” refers to the income that someone makes after their work has already been completed. An example of residual income is the earnings an author continues to make on a book after it has been published, when fans continue to purchase copies years later. Residual income is ideal because it is money that is being earned while doing nothing in the present moment to earn that money.

Dozens of times, especially in the beginning before I started making money with my book. I doubted whether people were going to buy it or not. I kept saying, What am I doing wasting my time here? The hard thing about building a business online and passive income is that you have to put the work in upfront, and while you’re putting in that work, you’re not getting paid for it. It’s not like traditional work where you put in X hours and you get paid for X hours. You might put in days, month, even years of work before you start to get paid. It does not happen overnight, and it takes a lot of hard work and dedication. Even after the book was sold, I had doubts.


You can publish a book in two forms: paperback and e-book. E-books are much easier to get published, and they’re wildly popular these days. They’re also convenient for the reader. After writing an e-book, all you have to do is set up an account on a seller, like Amazon or Nookpress, and start promoting your book! Here is a simple guide on getting your e-book published. As I mentioned before, if you already have an audience, such as on a website, that’s the best place to promote your e-book. This article will also explain how to set up a website.
On August 4, 2003, Brad and Karen Murray’s marriage ended. They continued arguing over their assets for another four years. Brad worked as an independent broker for Ameriplan – a marketing company specializing in providing discounted rates on services related to healthcare. As part of his job, Brad sold monthly memberships to Ameriplan’s discounted health plans. He also recruited other brokers to do the same.
Some of these lists are available via the official Product Advertising API, but many of them are not. Being able to use any of the features listed above (and some more) to find and review a product that precisely matches the focus of your particular niche site, seems like a surefire way to build an interesting review site and to grow your following. That’s why it seems natural, that a true curation plugin should work on an item-by-item basis.
That opportunity was always there, but I didn’t realize it until after four or five people said, “Pat, your stuff is so good, I would pay you for it.” That’s when I finally took action. I began reading as much as I could about doing business online and listening to podcasts and reaching out to people doing it already. I connected with them and created an ebook study guide, a digital book that could help my visitors pass the LEED exam.

Interesting post thanks. I have had similar thoughts about the passive income model – it’s not “passive income” at all, it’s just a different business model where you do the same amount of work to build a product/service and support clients in a slightly less direct way than standard freelance/project work. There are also greater risks with the passive income model – if you are simply selling your time as a freelancer or WordPress agency, you are guaranteed to be paid for your time. Whereas you can spend months or years developing a product, service or blog in the hopes of attaining “passive income”, only to find that it doesn’t take off and you never get paid for this time. In theory the gains of a passive income business are greater as it is scalable and the amount of work doesn’t necessarily increase as you get more sales, but the risks are greater too.
The Automatic Millionaire – I randomly found it in a used bookstore years ago and decided to check it out. Little did I know that it was a #1 bestseller and still well read today. I found it was an easy read and gained some valuable ideas from it. The first is that you need to “Pay Yourself First” meaning don’t invest what you have at the end of the month after all your expenses are taken out. Set aside what you’re going to invest first, then the rest of your budget should adjust to that. And then like the title suggests, automate your savings and debt payments and that will put you on the right path to being wealthy.
Sorry I don’t think blogging is passive income. Truly passive income comes in rain or shine – pensions, annuities, dividends, SS. In some cases, even when you are 6 feet under (for your beneficiaries). I would even venture to call it “permanent income” (as long as someone is around to collect). As someone else stated, even rental income is not truly passive since there is a fair amount of work going into keeping renters, maintenance, administrative/financial accounting, etc.
Admittedly, there are 100s of books out there covering the exact same stuff, but what I like about this – and in a similar vein to Get Rich Click – it’s the comprehensive listing and side-by-side comparison of all the different techniques and tips that I freaking love.  Once again, I know all the stuff in this book pretty well now, but I still run over it frequently to jog my memory and use it to work out whether I’ve covered all my bases – kind of like a checklist in that sense.
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