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About Blog The College Investor helps millennials get out of student loan debt to start investing, building passive income, and wealth for the future. Today, it's the go to resource for millennials looking for information about how to get out of student loan debt and start investing in their future. Follow this blog to get tips on Millennial Personal Finance and Investing.
On August 4, 2003, Brad and Karen Murray’s marriage ended. They continued arguing over their assets for another four years. Brad worked as an independent broker for Ameriplan – a marketing company specializing in providing discounted rates on services related to healthcare. As part of his job, Brad sold monthly memberships to Ameriplan’s discounted health plans. He also recruited other brokers to do the same.

In equity valuation, residual income represents an economic earnings stream and valuation method for estimating the intrinsic value of a company's common stock. The residual income valuation model values a company as the sum of book value and the present value of expected future residual income. Residual income attempts to measure economic profit, which is the profit remaining after the deduction of opportunity costs for all sources of capital.


If you have money to invest, but you’re not sure if you should, then consider this. What will you be doing with the money anyway? Unless you’re buying something, the money will either be in liquid form or you’ll deposit it in the bank. It will earn a fraction of the return it could earn through stocks. Investing in stocks is a better way to save and grow your income.
If Uber was a thing in my country I would do this every day as you can earn enormous amounts of money just by driving other people to work and back home, while doing the same thing for yourself. This can turn out to be a fun experiment as it will bring you money, and you will have people in your car keeping you accompanied on your way to work and back home. It’s like a school bus, but better!
I always knew it would take hard graft and a lot of time. I started writing three years ago, at that time, for no other reason than I wanted to put pen to paper. However, over the years my blog has developed into something I would like to focus more on and would like to monetise it. So can I ask, are there any good books or other websites etc I should be reading to help with SEO etc – I understand the basics but I now want to know more.
Amazon let’s you enroll in KDP Select when you’re publishing, which lets you give away the book for free on some days. Amazon markets the book heavily and the idea is to get people to try out your book and write reviews or to buy your other paid products. I did this in the beginning because that’s what I heard was effective, but it did nothing for me. I feel there are a few lessons learned:
Blogging has a very steep learning curve, but if you jump in head first and take it one step at a time (I recommend tackling only one confusing thing per day) and do one new thing each day to work on your blog, you will eventually get to a place where none of it seems confusing! (If you try to tackle too many new things at once, you WILL get discouraged! I urge you not to do this.)
Now I’ve been using Swagbucks for a while and have found the money works out to just under $2 an hour so this isn’t something that’s going to make you rich. You’d have to work 2,500 hours to make $5,000 so that’s about three and a half months, non-stop. The thing with Swagbucks though is you can do it when you’re doing something else so I flip through surveys and other stuff while I’m cooking dinner or flipping channels.

I no longer count traditional publishing as passive income because after you’ve spent half a dozen years pitching agents, arguing with publishers, and having your heart broken repeatedly only to make about a dollar per book, it’s not really passive income. More like overdue income. The responsibility that traditionally published authors shoulder is much too high and the cut far too little to make this even a profitable, let alone passive, income option for most writers.
These photos don’t have to be really impressive at first sight, or mind blowing at all. Regular everyday photos of chickens, or iPads, or desks with some drawings on it get sold as well as others as you never know what someone might be looking for. Places like Shutterstock and iStock are among the best in their league as they also have the most buyers which is what you really want.
You need to decide which machines you want to run, get the necessary licenses to operate them (you're selling items so you need to get sales licenses and whatnot from your state), buy the machines and a truck for the items in the machines, find a supplier of the products, and then finally you can secure locations. Finally, you need to service them periodically or hire someone to service them.

Frequent updates -- Sometimes you just won't feel like blogging, and that's okay. Don't stress yourself out feeling like you have to stick to rigid posting schedules or that you have to post every day. Are frequent updates nice? Sure they are. But they're not always required. I mentioned my two highest-earning blogs (small business and PR) before. Both of them can go for months at a time without an update. In fact, I took an announced 6 month hiatus from NakedPR.com previously. During that break traffic nearly doubled, and income followed suit. Even here, where I try to post more frequently (even twice a day a lot of days), I see subscribers and traffic increase when I go a few days without posting. It's become pretty predictable. So go ahead. Feel free to take a break every now and then. It gives your readers a chance to catch up or dig into your archives (where some of your best content might be hidden away). Don't decide on a solid schedule up front. Play with it and see what works best for your niche and your readers.

Thus, the residual income approach is better than the return on investment approach, since it accepts any investment proposal that exceeds the minimum required return on investment. Conversely, the return on investment approach tends to result in the rejection of any project whose projected return is less than the average rate of return of the profit center, even if the projected return is greater than the minimum required rate of return.
The underlying idea is that investors require a rate of return from their resources – i.e. equity – under the control of the firm's management, compensating them for their opportunity cost and accounting for the level of risk resulting. This rate of return is the cost of equity, and a formal equity cost must be subtracted from net income. Consequently, to create shareholder value, management must generate returns at least as great as this cost. Thus, although a company may report a profit on its income statement, it may actually be economically unprofitable; see Economic profit. It is thus possible that a value deemed positive using a traditional discounted cash flow (DCF) approach may be negative here. RI-based valuation is therefore a valuable complement to more traditional techniques.
Investing in a business: Another good way to generate passive income is to invest in a business --even a small one -- in return for a percentage of the profits - just like Shark Tank, only smaller. Lending $10,000 to a local business that, for example, is working on a mobile app for Apple phones could lead to a passive income-generated share of the profits when that mobile app starts selling like hot cakes.

Once again, though, it’s like starting any company. While you might not necessarily need to know how to code, you do need an entrepreneurial mindset, work ethic, and personality type, and you’ll probably struggle for years, going through a string of failures before you finally get it right. If you’re successful, though, the passive income potential is enormous.
I made guest posts on other blogs/college admission websites on topics like what makes a great application or how to write a great essay. I linked to my book, and get maybe 1 sale a month that I can attribute to these blogs. It’s not great for sales, but it did help my book get ranked higher on Google searches and I met and helped out some cool people, which is nice.
This book is a definite must read, and in the top 5 out of this list.  My favorite use for this book is to help people decide what business model to pursue – for a start anyway.  ie info product v membership site v affiliate marketing.  Since Joel compares them all and shows you the major challenges for each (along with how-to guides), the task becomes a lot easier.
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