Those who can reap the benefits of residual income have typically put in an immense amount of effort and time in the beginning to be able to enjoy the rewards later on. Residual income, therefore, does not result in instant gratification. Those interested in earning residual income must have a lot of patience and determination to work as hard as necessary to achieve their ultimate goals of a long-standing income stream.
In the past, most people wouldn’t have considered selling software to be a source of passive income, but I believe that’s changing. Thanks to tools like Bubble, creating simple web or mobile apps is easier than ever before. You can do a lot without knowing how to code or hiring a developer, and in the future, I think that’s only going to become more and more true.

Residual income is the amount of net income generated in excess of the minimum rate of return. Residual income concepts have been used in a number of contexts, including as a measurement of internal corporate performance whereby a company's management team evaluates the return generated relative to the company's minimum required return. Alternatively, in personal finance, residual income is the level of income that an individual has after the deduction of all personal debts and expenses have been paid.
Stock dividends: Some stocks, especially stocks from big corporate standouts, pay dividends to shareholders based on the number of shares they own, and the percentage of the stock price on the dividend date. For example, if a company pays out 3% on a stock that's trading at $100 per share, you'll earn $3 for every share of that stock you own. Add it up and that can be good take-home pay as a passive investment.

"Residual disability" is generally defined as the inability to perform one or more duties of your occupation, or the inability to perform these duties as often as before, coupled with the loss of a significant percentage of your pre-disability income. While "partial disability" is similar to residual disability, the ways in which benefits are calculated for these two types of coverage differ.


The advantage of making your publication part of the Kindle Unlimited program is that Amazon actively promotes your book to KU subscribers, who are likely to take a punt on a title if it catches their eye. This can help increase your BSR, bringing you closer to the top of the chart. And each time somebody downloads and reads your book, you get a fee.
"What makes business work is creating value. If you're going into the business with the intention of not creating value, but of having it magically provide money for you, then you often make really bad choices. The business that you're investing in or creating doesn't tend to be creating value for its customers or for anyone. So it doesn't tend to spit off the cash you're hoping it will. So many times I've seen people pursue passive income, and end up having active losses instead. They just spend a lot of time and money trying to push responsibilities off on other people and having it not work."
Great post and comments. All your points in the article are spot on. My vote is Definitely NOT passive income. Launched my blog about 1 year ago without a lot of clear direction. After working with a productivity coach, we narrowed the focus (somewhat) and got rolling with more regular posts in March/April 2017. Small budget outsourcing on Graphics and SEO moved the needle a bit further. Google Adwords campaign a bit further. I just spent about 5 hours re-working a guest blog post for a food site, after already putting in at least 5 hours on the original version. Especially in the early years, there is NOTHING passive about sweat equity. Reducing the learning curve really does add real skills though, so you can hit the ground running and efficiently manage your time. Was interesting to see the vote tallies, thanks for the post.
The paperback’s formatting could also be improved. I basically just messed around in LibreOffice on Mac to get formatting to work, but I wish I would’ve started with a tool like Jutoh, which is fantastic for formatting and publishing. My workflow was Google Drive exports to LibreOffice, and Google Drive just wasn’t good for editing once you cross 40–50 pages. In the future I’d like to format a better sized paperback.
FYI – If you’re already a blogger and want some solid ways to increase income from posts and products you already have, I highly recommend snagging a copy of Income Boost. It’s a quick read and will boil down some of my favorite income producing methods into exactly what you need to implement like right now for instant cash. You can use the coupon code “GET5” during checkout to receive $5 off the purchase price.
According to Uncle Sam, you need to be "materially involved" in an enterprise to earn active income. With passive income, it's just the opposite, as the IRS deems you to be earning passive income if you're not materially involved with a profit-making enterprise. By and large, expect income to be taxable if you are engaged in a passive income enterprise. You will need to report earnings to the IRS.
Writing an e-book is very popular among bloggers, as many have noted that “it's just a bunch of blog posts put together!” You will not only have to make an investment of time and energy to create the e-book, but market it correctly. However, if marketed correctly (through blogging affiliates in your niche, for example), you could have residual sales that last a very long time.
About Blog Hi, I’m the Passive Income Earner. I also go by other names, such as Canadian Dividend Growth Investor. I’m based in Canada and I’m on a journey to build a passive income with dividends. In this blog, I share my experience in personal finance and investing, including mistakes I made and lessons learned. Occasionally, I will also write about financial and investing concepts I learn. Follow this blog to know about my journey on passive income through dividends.

Link-building campaigns -- My SEO-centric pals might want to hit me for this, but frankly I've found that most traditional link-building is a royal waste of time. Don't submit your site to every free directory you can find. Don't waste time submitting news releases to all of the free press release distribution sites you can. Don't post short, garbage comments on other people's blogs just to get the link back. Don't engage in link exchanges. Don't get me wrong. There are ways you can increase links early on that I do recommend, but I suggest them far more for the exposure value. Those things would include linking to other blogs from your posts (the bloggers often know who's linking to them, and they might come to check out your post -- it's a good way to start networking with others in your niche). You could also comment on other blogs and include your link, but only do this if you have something substantive to add. Otherwise you just look like a schmuck. The absolute best way to build links to your blog however is to simply create great content that people deem worth linking to. Remember, it's not just about linkback quantity. It's about getting quality, relevant links back from sites who cater to your audience (who not only provide link juice, but direct traffic).

I know subscriptions are a litttttlleeee controversial but hear me out: bloggers like ElephantJournal have been super successful using Wall Street Journals approach of providing 3-5 posts a month for free and then asking for a small subscription fee. This one is worth thoroughly A/B testing though, because if it impacts your session depth and overall pageviews, your display ad revenue will take a hit.


Now you have some of the basic dos and "do it if you feel like its." But how can you actually earn money from your blog? First and foremost, if your blog is in your specialty area, you should absolutely use it to promote your freelance writing services (even if just linking to your professional site). It can be a highly effective way of increasing business in general. But let's forget about that and think about more direct income from your blogs. Here are the tools and strategies I used to take my small business blog from nothing to a four figure income in just a few months:
Frequent updates -- Sometimes you just won't feel like blogging, and that's okay. Don't stress yourself out feeling like you have to stick to rigid posting schedules or that you have to post every day. Are frequent updates nice? Sure they are. But they're not always required. I mentioned my two highest-earning blogs (small business and PR) before. Both of them can go for months at a time without an update. In fact, I took an announced 6 month hiatus from NakedPR.com previously. During that break traffic nearly doubled, and income followed suit. Even here, where I try to post more frequently (even twice a day a lot of days), I see subscribers and traffic increase when I go a few days without posting. It's become pretty predictable. So go ahead. Feel free to take a break every now and then. It gives your readers a chance to catch up or dig into your archives (where some of your best content might be hidden away). Don't decide on a solid schedule up front. Play with it and see what works best for your niche and your readers.
There are many ways to earn an income both online and offline. The main goal for most people is to earn a large enough income so they can accomplish and live the life that they choose on their terms. The unfortunate fact is, most people don't have the ability to live their lives on their own terms. They are a slave to their debts and they cannot break the cycle of living pay check to pay check.
Under throughput analysis, the only factor that matters is the impact of a proposed investment on the ability of a business to increase its total throughput (revenue minus totally variable costs). Under this concept, the main focus is on either enhancing throughput through the bottleneck operation or in reducing operating expenses. This analysis requires a consideration of bottleneck usage by the likely mix of products to be manufactured, and their margins. This is a much more detailed analysis than is contemplated under the more simplistic residual income approach.
About Blog No Passive Income gives information about how to build a passive income, together with blogging, SEO, social media, internet marketing and now also small business tips. Tips about blogging, social media, SEO, internet marketing, investing & online business. Follow this site and learn how to build an income and reach financial stability.
I'm going to be choosing a niche and domain name this week and launching a new WordPress blog. The only money I'll spend will be for the domain name (I'll use existing hosting as you might do if you're already hosting your own professional site). No paid advertising. No paying for custom designs or coding. I'll be launching the blog in the same way many of you might -- spending as little as possible up front.

Mark Atwood, the author of this book has a vast experience in Passive Income and he explained the concepts of Passive Income from his own experience. This book uncovers most of the latest, important and useful techniques that a professional earner uses in his projects. It is a good reference because it shows you the techniques exactly. It's not the book with full of theories rather an instructive tutorial which involves you with the real thing.
Most websites say you should build up an email audience and give them early access and ask them to write reviews. I had no such audience. So when I launched, I emailed tons of my college friends, high school friends, and made posts on Facebook and LinkedIn announcing the book was out there. Some people posted reviews, which helped initially. I also gave out free copies to people if they expressed interest in being reviewers, but many of them never wrote a review :(
Of course, you can make honst money in Internet info-products, or affiliate marketing, or other such areas where people tend to get drawn to "passive income" fantasies. But, to make real money over the sustainable long-haul, you must treat these like any other business. In other words, you must provide real value to real customers with a real need.
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